April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Gene Networks in the Mouse Retina
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. W. Abner
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Tennessee HSC, Memphis, Tennessee
  • L. Lu
    Anatomy and Neurobiology and Center for Integrative and Translational Genomics,
    University of Tennessee HSC, Memphis, Tennessee
  • R. W. Williams
    Anatomy and Neurobiology and Center for Integrative and Translational Genomics,
    University of Tennessee HSC, Memphis, Tennessee
  • W. E. Orr
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Tennessee HSC, Memphis, Tennessee
  • J. P. Templeton
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Tennessee HSC, Memphis, Tennessee
  • N. E. Freeman-Anderson
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Tennessee HSC, Memphis, Tennessee
  • E. E. Geisert
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Tennessee HSC, Memphis, Tennessee
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C.W. Abner, None; L. Lu, None; R.W. Williams, None; W.E. Orr, None; J.P. Templeton, None; N.E. Freeman-Anderson, None; E.E. Geisert, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  This project was supported by an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, an NEI grant R01EY017841 and NEI Core Grant (EY13080).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 3080. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      C. W. Abner, L. Lu, R. W. Williams, W. E. Orr, J. P. Templeton, N. E. Freeman-Anderson, E. E. Geisert; Gene Networks in the Mouse Retina. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):3080.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Individual differences in retinal gene expressions account for much of the diversity in ocular phenotype and susceptibility to disease. The present study examines the diversity of gene expression in the BXD recombinant inbred strains (RI) of mice.

Methods: : In the Hamilton Eye Institute Mouse Retina Database (HEI-MRD), we quantified mRNA levels of the transcriptome from retinas using Illumina Sentrix BeadChip Array MouseWG-6v2 arrays. The Control HEI-MRD consists of gene expression data (males and female averages) from 75 BXD RI strains and the parental strains (C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J), the reciprocal crosses and the BALB/c mouse. The database is presented on GeneNetwork (www.genenetwork.org), along with a variety of powerful bioinformatics tools.

Results: : In combination with GN, the HEI-MRD provides a large resource for mapping, graphing, analyzing, and testing complex genetic networks. mRNA levels can be used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to expression differences among the BXD strains, and to establish links between classical ocular phenotypes associated with differences in genomic sequence. This resource can be used to extract unique transcriptome signatures for specific cell types in the retina. We are also able to extract genetic networks that appear to modulate the response of the retina to injury. The HEI-MRD complements and extends our previous whole eye transcriptome resource that is in GN (Hamilton Eye Institute Eye Database).

Conclusions: : The high level of variation in mRNA levels found among BXD RI strains of mice can be used to explore and test expression networks underlying variation in retina structure, function, and disease susceptibility. We now present the final draft of the HEI-MRD on GeneNetwork (genenetwork.org).

Keywords: gene microarray • gene modifiers • retinal development 
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