April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Short-Duration Visual Evoked Potential as an Objective Tool for Screening Refractive Errors
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Anand
    Einhorn Clinical Research Center, The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • C. G. De Moraes
    Einhorn Clinical Research Center, The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • J. M. Liebmann
    Einhorn Clinical Research Center, The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • R. Ritch
    Einhorn Clinical Research Center, The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • C. Tello
    Einhorn Clinical Research Center, The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Anand, None; C.G. De Moraes, None; J.M. Liebmann, Diopsys Inc., F; Diopsys Inc., C; R. Ritch, Diopsys Inc., F; C. Tello, Diopsys Inc., F.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 3279. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A. Anand, C. G. De Moraes, J. M. Liebmann, R. Ritch, C. Tello; Short-Duration Visual Evoked Potential as an Objective Tool for Screening Refractive Errors. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):3279.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To investigate the role of short-duration transient visual evokedpotentials (SD-VEP) for objective measurement of spherical refractiveerrors.

 
Methods:
 

Refractive errors were induced by means of trial lenses (+20to -20 diopters) in 35 emmetropic subjects with 20/20 vision.A synchronised single-channel EEG (checkerboard reversal patternat 85% Michelson contrast) was recorded for emmetropic stateand each simulated refractive error using an Enfant TM NOVASystem (Diopsys Inc., Pine Brook, NJ) to generate 735 VEP recordings.Amplitude and latency of P100, N75 and delta N75-P100 were identifiedfrom filtered waveforms. To minimize the effect of baselineshift and waveform fluctuations, an 18-point scoring system,based on software derived P100 latency, delta (P100-N75) amplitudeand waveform quality was used to estimate spherical equivalent(SE) (Figure 1). Optimal cut-off scores for different refractiveerrors were determined using ROC curves.

 
Results:
 

Median age was 25 (IR: 22-28) years. Induced hypermetropia andmyopia correlated strongly with both delta (P100-N75) amplitude(r: -0.94, p<0.001; r: -0.90, p<0.001) and P100 latency(r: 0.85, p=0.003, r: 0.79, p=0.02). The 18-point SD-VEP scoringhad a high sensitivity and specificity for emmetropia and refractiveerrors up to 14 diopters (Table1). A single SD-VEP can discernemmetropia from uncorrected ametropia with high sensitivityand specificity.

 
Conclusions:
 

SD-VEP has a potential for objective screening and assessmentof refractive errors.  

 

 
Keywords: refraction • electrophysiology: clinical • visual cortex 
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