April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Transcranial Orbitotomy for Ocular-Orbital Histopathology: The FULL Autopsy Is Not Full Enough
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. K. Thiagarajasubramanian
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • M. Lubow
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • B. Schultz
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • D. M. Grzybowski
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A.K. Thiagarajasubramanian, None; M. Lubow, None; B. Schultz, None; D.M. Grzybowski, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Dorothy M. Bennett & Clark L. Bennett Medical Research Scholarship, Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 3515. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      A. K. Thiagarajasubramanian, M. Lubow, B. Schultz, D. M. Grzybowski; Transcranial Orbitotomy for Ocular-Orbital Histopathology: The FULL Autopsy Is Not Full Enough. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):3515. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

Orbital tissues are not routinely accessible at autopsy, although they could show systemic pathology. This procedure accesses important ocular/orbital tissues by a transcranial-orbital approach for study. Obtained tissues include the posterior globe, optic nerve, and adjacent structures, while leaving behind anterior structures and so preserving the decedent’s external appearance for display and burial procedures.

 
Methods:
 

This technique as shown in our sequence of images was developed at autopsies conducted at our university morgue. Literature was reviewed for topics pertinent to these ocular and orbital tissues, and to consider pathology that might be missed by neglecting them.

 
Results:
 

We have successfully developed and demonstrated a previously unpublished technique that gives access to ocular-orbital tissues including not only retina, choroid, sclera, and optic nerve, but also important blood vessels, muscles, and more, under consent for the "full autopsy." This technique leaves no marks on the decedent’s face, while satisfying ceremonial and scientific demands. The attached image shows the end-result and the intact facial appearance of the deceased.

 
Conclusions:
 

The scientific and clinical information inherent in these tissues, newly available, could now benefit clinicians and investigators. This transcranial approach resolves legal, ceremonial, and emotional concerns while permitting access to tissues that exhibit ocular and orbital signs of local and systemic disease. With this technique, each autopsy is an opportunity for new information.  

 
Keywords: retina • optic nerve • pathology techniques 
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