April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Biocompatibility of Modified Gellan and Poly(methacryamide) Formulations for Use in Ophthalmic Hydrogel Substitutes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • P. D. Hamilton
    Ophthalmology Research JC 151,
    VA Medical Center, St Louis, Missouri
  • H. Du
    Ophthalmology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
  • N. Ravi
    Ophthalmology Research/Executive Branch,
    VA Medical Center, St Louis, Missouri
    Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  P.D. Hamilton, None; H. Du, None; N. Ravi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  This research was supported by a Department of Veterans Affairs review grant to Dr. Nathan Ravi, Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc., NIH Core Grant (P30 EY 02687), and Washington University.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 3594. doi:https://doi.org/
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      P. D. Hamilton, H. Du, N. Ravi; Biocompatibility of Modified Gellan and Poly(methacryamide) Formulations for Use in Ophthalmic Hydrogel Substitutes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):3594. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

There is a continuing need for better artificial substitutes for vitreous, and accommodative intra-ocular lens materials. This work is an extension of our developing materials that employ disulfide reversible cross-linkers, allowing the resultant copolymers to be reduced, dissolved, and re-gelled in situ.

 
Methods:
 

Gelzan (Sigma, St. Louis), a deacylated form of gellan, was modified with the incorporation of disulfide cross-linkers. Copolymer hydrogels with the methacryl molar formulations of 78% methacrylamide, 20% sodium methacrylate, and 2% bismethacryloyl cystamine were synthesized as described by Hamilton et al., Polym Mater Sci Eng, 101:293, 2009. Polymers were tested for biocompatibility employing thiazylol blue (MTT) in tissue culture using ARPE-19, human retinal epithelial cells from ATCC. There were two Gelzan preparations, with 9% (low) and 21% (high) -SH groups/saccharide unit of Gelzan. These preparations formed gels at 2 mg/mL in PBS. There were also two preparations of copolymer. These preparations formed gels at 12 mg/mL. Lot 1 was washed with acetone while Lot 2 was washed with ethanol, for the purpose of removing unincorporated organics.

 
Results:
 

Graphs from the biocompatibility experiment are shown in the figure.

 
Conclusions:
 

Gelzan forms transparent ionic gels that are highly elastic. The incorporation of an S-S cross-linker prevents the dissolution of these gels in the absence of ions, and makes them more permanent. The high level of S-S incorporation had a negative effect on cell morphology and cell growth. The formulation of methacrylamide copolymers tested results in a highly transparent viscoelastic gel. From these results, acetone washing gave a better end product than washing with ethanol. Morphology of the ARPE 19 cells in the presence of the low SH Gelzan and copolymer Lot 1 appeared relatively normal.  

 
Keywords: vitreous substitutes • accommodation • vitreoretinal surgery 
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