April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Wavefront Aberrations and Modulation Transfer Functions of Multifocal Intraocular Lenses in Visible and Infrared Wavelengths
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Y. Hirohara
    Optics Laboratory, Topcon Corporation, Itabashi, Japan
    Department of Applied Visual Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • M. Saika
    Optics Laboratory, Topcon Corporation, Itabashi, Japan
  • T. Fujikado
    Department of Applied Visual Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • T. Oshika
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clin, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • T. Mihashi
    Optics Laboratory, Topcon Corporation, Itabashi, Japan
    Department of Applied Visual Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Y. Hirohara, Topcon Corp., E; M. Saika, Topcon Corp., E; T. Fujikado, None; T. Oshika, None; T. Mihashi, Topcon Corp., E.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 3962. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Y. Hirohara, M. Saika, T. Fujikado, T. Oshika, T. Mihashi; Wavefront Aberrations and Modulation Transfer Functions of Multifocal Intraocular Lenses in Visible and Infrared Wavelengths. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):3962. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : We measured three types of IOLs using a two-wavelength Shack-Hartmann wavefront aberrometer (SHWA) and modulation transfer function (MTF) equipment and investigated the validity of a wavefront aberration (WA) measurement of multifocal IOLs.

Methods: : A monofocal IOL (Sensar AR40e AMO), a refractive multifocal IOL (ReZoom NXG1 AMO), and an apodized diffractive multifocal IOL (AcrySof Restor SA60D3 Alcon) were measured. We developed an aberration-free artificial eye (AFAE) which could hold an IOL to measure its aberration and MTF in the water. Wavefront sensing (WS) was performed on the AFAE with each IOL using a two-wavelength (561nm and 840nm) SHWA. Through focus MTF (TF-MTF) of the AFAE with the IOLs were also measured using a TF-MTF measurement system (MATRIX PLUS Nanotex corp.) in visible and near infrared (NIR) wavelengths.

Results: : RMS of the WAs of the AR40e was 0.01µm for the 4-mm circle area and 0.06µm for the 6-mm circular area. Spatial pattern of Hartmann image of the NXG1 was distorted and the distortion was rotationally symmetrical because the IOL had five annular power zones. TF-MTF calculated from the WAs had peaks at two defocus positions. PSFs in the Hartmann image of the AFAE with SA60D3 were blurred a little with 840-nm WS but some PSFs were split into two spots with 561-nm WS. We could calculate distant or near refraction selecting one of those split PSFs. TF-MTF of the AR40e had a peak only at one focus position, but that of NXG1 had peaks at two defocus positions in both wavelengths. TF-MTF of the SA60D3 had peaks at two defocus positions in 561nm, but one peak in 840nm.

Conclusions: : We could evaluate multifocality of the diffractive multifocal IOL using the visible wavelength. We also confirmed that wavefront sensing of a diffractive multifocal IOL with an infrared wavelength is valid to measure distance vision.

Keywords: intraocular lens • aberrations • optical properties 
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