April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Protein Profile Changes in Monkey Lenses Due to Aging and Soy-Rich Diet
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. M. Chaves
    Vision Sciences,
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
  • R. Gupta
    Vision Sciences,
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
  • K. Srivastava
    Vision Sciences,
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
  • A. K. Gill
    Vision Sciences,
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
  • L. S. Wilson
    Comprehensive Cancer Center Proteomics/Mass Spectrometry Shared Facility,
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
  • O. P. Srivastava
    Vision Sciences,
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.M. Chaves, None; R. Gupta, None; K. Srivastava, None; A.K. Gill, None; L.S. Wilson, None; O.P. Srivastava, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH-EY06400 and EyeSight Foundation of Alabama
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 4583. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      J. M. Chaves, R. Gupta, K. Srivastava, A. K. Gill, L. S. Wilson, O. P. Srivastava; Protein Profile Changes in Monkey Lenses Due to Aging and Soy-Rich Diet. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):4583.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To analyze the profiles of water soluble (WS) and water insoluble (WI) lens proteins of young and old monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) fed soy-rich and soy-deficient diets.

Methods: : The monkey lenses were divided into the following four experimental groups: (i) young control (6- to 9-year-old fed a soy-free diet for 30 months, named YC), (ii) young on soy-diet (6- to 9-year-old fed soy [2 mg/g] for 30 months, named YS), (iii) old control (15 year-old or older fed a soy-free diet for 30 months, named OC), and (iv) old on soy-diet (15-year-old or older fed soy [2 mg/g] for 30 months, named OS). Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) was used to investigate the statistically significant changes in protein abundance in the WS- and WI-protein fractions of each group, and their identity and post-translational modifications (PTMs) were determined by Q-TRAP mass spectrometric method. Multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used to determine the molar mass of the WS-proteins of the four experimental groups.

Results: : Lenses from the YS group exhibited relatively greater levels of WI-proteins compared to lenses from YC, OC, and OS groups. MALS results showed a higher molar mass range of WS-HMW proteins in YS lenses compared to YC lenses, but a similar molar mass range to those from OC and OS lenses. The 2-D DIGE analysis of WS- and WI-protein profiles showed statistically significant differences between the YC and YS groups, but such differences were not found between the profiles of lenses from OC and OS groups. Additionally, even matched spots with statistically similar amounts of proteins contained varied crysallins and PTMs. Some PTMs such as oxidation, methylation, and deamidation of crystallins increased with aging, and these also increased in lenses of the YS group compared to the YC group.

Conclusions: : The proteome of macaca fascicularis changed with aging and soy consumption at a young age. The changes due to soy were statistically significant in the young, but not in the lenses of older monkeys. The soy consumption at young age did not show beneficial effect as an anti-oxidant. While aging increased the molar mass range of the HMW proteins as well as the number of PTMs, so did soy consumption at a young age.

Keywords: proteomics • crystallins • protein modifications-post translational 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×