April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Growth Factor Profiles in Vitreous Samples of Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. J. Faia
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • B. R. Garretson
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • G. A. Williams
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • A. J. Ruby
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • A. Capone, Jr.
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • K. A. Drenser
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  L.J. Faia, None; B.R. Garretson, None; G.A. Williams, None; A.J. Ruby, None; A. Capone, Jr., None; K.A. Drenser, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 5099. doi:
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      L. J. Faia, B. R. Garretson, G. A. Williams, A. J. Ruby, A. Capone, Jr., K. A. Drenser; Growth Factor Profiles in Vitreous Samples of Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):5099.

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Abstract

Purpose: : To describe the growth factor profile found in the vitreous samples of patients with diabetic retinopathy and to determine if there is a difference in the protein levels of expression of transforming growth factor beta-1 and -2 (TGF-b-1 and -b-2), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) between the diabetic and non-diabetic profiles.

Methods: : Seventy-five samples were collected from 75 patients at the time of surgical intervention. The levels of TGF-b-1 and b-2, IGF-1, and HGF were analyzed and compared between the diabetic and non-diabetic groups and within the diabetic group (proliferative versus non-proliferative, active versus inactive).

Results: : The concentrations of TGF-b-1 and TGF-b-2 were significantly higher in the diabetic group versus the controls (p=0.006 and 0.002, respectively). The levels of IGF-1 and HGF were also higher in the diabetic group but only significant concerning the HGF concentrations (p=0.9 and p<0.001, respectively). Specifically in the proliferative diabetic samples, those which were vascularly active had higher concentrations of TGF-b-1 and TGF-b-2 versus the inactive proliferative diabetic and non-proliferative diabetic samples (TGF-b-1: active PDR 132+/-39 pg/mg of protein, inactive PDR 36+/-17 pg/mg of protein, and NPDR 8+/-3 pg/mg of protein; TGF-b-2: active PDR 1506+/-204 pg/mg of protein, inactive PDR 476+/-64 pg/mg of protein, and NPDR 887+/-202 pg/mg of protein), with the differences between the inactive PDR and NPDR samples not being statistically significant (TGF-b-1 p=0.25, TGF-b-2 p=0.14).

Conclusions: : TGF-b-1 and TGF-b-2 were found to be elevated in the diabetic samples, less so in the inactive PDR and NPDR samples, as compared to the controls. Knowing these differences may be useful in determining the management of these patients, as some current medical therapies in the presence of elevated TGF- b-2 may be more detrimental ("diabetic crunch") and surgical therapy a more appropriate intervention. This data may also be used in the development and assessment of future targeted therapies in order to prevent progression before interventions are necessary.

Keywords: diabetic retinopathy • growth factors/growth factor receptors • vitreoretinal surgery 
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