April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Uveitis in Relation to Perceived Stress: A Prospective Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Paa
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • A. Ou
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • S. R. Kedhar
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • J. Chau
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • B. Niknam
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • J. Lewis
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • M. Rivas
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • C. A. Samson
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J. Paa, None; A. Ou, None; S.R. Kedhar, None; J. Chau, None; B. Niknam, None; J. Lewis, None; M. Rivas, None; C.A. Samson, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 5357. doi:
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      J. Paa, A. Ou, S. R. Kedhar, J. Chau, B. Niknam, J. Lewis, M. Rivas, C. A. Samson; Uveitis in Relation to Perceived Stress: A Prospective Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):5357.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To conduct a prospective analysis to determine the relationship between disease activity of noninfectious uveitis and stress.

Methods: : Consecutive adult patients presenting at The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary who were diagnosed with noninfectious uveitis were enrolled. Patients were asked to self-administer the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) - 10 (Cohen, et al, 1983) following informed consent. Prior to administration of the PSS-10 patients were asked, in their opinion, whether stress and uveitis were related. The presence of inflammation was then assessed and graded by the investigator according to the Standardization of Nomenclature (SUN) Working Group grading system. PSS-10 was re-administered and inflammation was assessed at all subsequent visits within a 6-month timeframe. Patient and the investigator were masked to the PSS scores.

Results: : 157 patients were enrolled beginning July 2009. An interim analysis done on the initial visits of 139 patients revealed that 81% (N=113) were quiescent and 19% (N=26) were active. The mean PSS score, on a scale of 0 to 40 was 19.00 for active and 18.16 for quiescent. 60% believed stress was a factor in their uveitis activity, while 17% felt it was not a factor, and 23% were undecided. Based on One-Way ANOVA and Tukey's Post Hoc tests, mean PSS scores were higher among patients who were active and believed stress was a factor than quiescent patients who believed stress was not a factor (p=0.067). When divided by age group, the mean PSS score was highest among 26-45 year olds and lowest among patients 55 and over.

Conclusions: : Initial analysis shows that PSS scores are similar regardless of activity; however a correlation can be seen between PSS score and belief that stress is a factor.Further investigation will include a longitudinal analysis of subsequent visits. Enrollment for the study will continue until N=200.

Keywords: uveitis-clinical/animal model • quality of life • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment 
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