April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Corticosteroids Inhibit Inflammatory Corneal Lymphangigenesis in vivo, but Display Proangiogenic Properties in vitro
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. Hos
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  • F. Bock
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  • D. R. Saban
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • B. Regenfuss
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  • J. Onderka
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  • S. Masli
    Ophthalmology/Harvard Med Sch, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
  • R. Dana
    MEEI/SERI Harvard Ophthalmology, Boston, Massachusetts
  • C. Cursiefen
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D. Hos, None; F. Bock, None; D.R. Saban, None; B. Regenfuss, None; J. Onderka, None; S. Masli, None; R. Dana, None; C. Cursiefen, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) Erlangen (A9), German Research Foundation: SFB 643 (B10)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 5695. doi:https://doi.org/
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      D. Hos, F. Bock, D. R. Saban, B. Regenfuss, J. Onderka, S. Masli, R. Dana, C. Cursiefen; Corticosteroids Inhibit Inflammatory Corneal Lymphangigenesis in vivo, but Display Proangiogenic Properties in vitro. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):5695. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Corticosteroids are widely used as potent anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of various corneal diseases. Purpose of this work was to analyze whether topical application of corticosteroids inhibits inflammatory corneal lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, we wanted to analyze which mechanisms underlie this effect.

Methods: : Inflammatory murine corneal neovascularization was induced by suture placement, corneas were then treated with topical Fluorometholone, Prednisolone or Dexamethasone. After one week, corneas were prepared and stained with LYVE-1 as a lymphatic endothelial specific marker. Pathological lymphangiogenesis was then detected semi-automatically on digitized whole mounts. The effect of corticosteroids on F4/80+ CD11b+ macrophage recruitment in vivo was assessed via immunohistochemistry and FACS analysis. The in vitro effect of corticosteroids on proinflammatory cytokine expression by macrophages (peritoneal exudate cells) was tested via real time PCR analysis.

Results: : Topical treatment with corticosteroids resulted in a significant reduction of inflammatory corneal lymphangiogenesis (p<0.001). The antilymphangiogenic effect of Fluorometholone was significantly weaker than that of Prednisolone and Dexamethasone (p<0.01). The recruitment of macrophages into the inflamed cornea was significantly inhibited by topical application of all corticosteroids ((p<0.001). Conversely, in vitro treatment of PECs with corticosteroids led to a significant upregulation of the expression levels of VEGF-A, VEGF-C and VEGF-D.

Conclusions: : Corticosteroids are strong inhibitors of inflammatory corneal lymphangiogenesis in vivo, with significant differences between various corticosteroids in terms of their antilymphangiogenic potency. The main mechanism of the antilymphangiogenic effect seems to be through the strong inhibition of macrophage recruitment. However, corticosteroids also display proangiogenic effects, at least in vitro.

Keywords: neovascularization • corticosteroids • cornea: basic science 
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