April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
A Video Study Evaluating Eye Drop Instillation in Subjects With Low Vision With Either Glaucoma or Retina Disease-Based Visual Impairment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. L. Hennessy
    Glaucoma Specialists, Baltimore, Maryland
    International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • J. Katz
    International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • D. Covert
    Research and Development, Alcon Laboratories, Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas
  • C. Protzko
    Glaucoma Specialists, Baltimore, Maryland
  • A. L. Robin
    Ophthalmology & Intl Health, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A.L. Hennessy, None; J. Katz, None; D. Covert, Alcon Laboratories, E; C. Protzko, None; A.L. Robin, Alcon, C; Merck, C; Pfizer, C; Vistakon, C; Glaukos, C.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Unrestricted educational grant from Alcon Laboratories
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 6016. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      A. L. Hennessy, J. Katz, D. Covert, C. Protzko, A. L. Robin; A Video Study Evaluating Eye Drop Instillation in Subjects With Low Vision With Either Glaucoma or Retina Disease-Based Visual Impairment. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):6016.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Evaluate and compare self-administration of eye drops in both visually impaired glaucoma and retina disease subjects. No prior studies have objectively analyzed and compared eye drop instillation in visually impaired patients with glaucoma or retina disease.

Methods: : Subjects completed a questionnaire on their drop use and were video-recorded instilling an artificial tear drop using a standardized 5-mL bottle onto their worse eye, with their dominant hand.

Results: : A total of 409 subjects (205 Glaucoma, 204 Retina) were included in the study. Differences between the two groups were as follows: Glaucoma subjects had fewer females (p=0.05), were younger (p<0.005), had fewer Caucasians (p<0.005), had less previous exposure to eye drop use (p<0.005), worse visual acuity (p<0.005) and less self-reported history of arthritis (p<0.05). Glaucoma subjects had more bilateral impairment (60% vs 42%, p<0.0005). Retina subjects instilled more drops onto the eye (1.7 vs 1.4, p=0.02) and more commonly contaminated the bottle (47% vs 33%, p=0.003). About one-third of each group could not get a drop onto the ocular surface with multiple attempts at instillation (30% Retina vs 29% Glaucoma, p=0.91). Among subjects placing only one drop, onto the eye, without touching the adnexae, there was a trend for glaucoma patients to perform slightly better, although both groups did poorly ("success"=39% Glaucoma vs 31% Retina, p=0.09).

Conclusions: : Among visually impaired subjects, eye drop self-administration was a significant problem, regardless of the etiology. Though baseline differences existed, both groups performed relatively poorly. Both groups had poor perception of their ability to instill eye drops, wasted drops, and contaminated bottle tips. This has implications for "unintentional" non-compliance in chronic glaucoma therapy, and may have implications for future therapeutic delivery systems.

Clinical Trial: : www.clinicaltrials.gov 00760240

Keywords: low vision • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials • retina 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×