April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Estimated Proportion of Japanese Patients With Low Vision and the Japanese Rating for the Classification With Visual Disability Certificate
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T. Nishida
    Ophthalmology, National Rehabilitation Center, Tokorozawa, Japan
  • N. Ando
    Ophthalmology, Saiseikai Niigata Daini Hospital, Niigata, Japan
  • K. Sado
    Ophthalmology, Sado Eye Clinic, Sendai, Japan
  • S. Nakadomari
    Ophthalmology, National Rehabilitation Center, Tokorozawa, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Nishida, None; N. Ando, None; K. Sado, None; S. Nakadomari, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 6017. doi:
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      T. Nishida, N. Ando, K. Sado, S. Nakadomari; Estimated Proportion of Japanese Patients With Low Vision and the Japanese Rating for the Classification With Visual Disability Certificate. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):6017.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : The Japanese rating for certification of visual disability is defined the 6th grade of classification as "The corrected visual acuity of one eye is less than 0.02 and the other eye is less than 0.6". The 5th grade of classification is "The sum of the corrected visual acuity of both eyes is less than 0.2." Under current Japanese classification, a person with corrected visual acuity of 0.6 in one eye is certified visually disabled; however, a person with corrected visual acuity of 0.2 in each eye is not certified disabled. In reality, the latter case has a lot of visually problems. To reconsider the criterion for the 6th grade of classification, we surveyed to estimate what proportion in Japan has the sum of the corrected visual acuity of both eyes is less than 0.62. In addition, we evaluated the data to see if a new Japanese rating for the classification with visual disability certification could be justified.

Methods: : 100 ophthalmology services in Japan were surveyed by questionnaire. The data was extracted from the records of the outpatients with a sum of the corrected visual acuity of both eyes is less than 0.62. The extraction procedure was done either at random or using numerical, name, and hospital visiting order. The survey items were collected to our database which included age, sex, with or without visual disability certificate, the rating of classification, corrected visual acuity of each eye, and name of any disease.

Results: : Of the 100 services surveyed 65 replied, and from 20,235 records of the patients 971 applicants with a sum of the corrected visual acuity of both eyes is less than 0.62. There was no statistical bias among the extraction procedures. The medium age of the extracted population was 71 years old, and 74.6% were over 60 years old. The distribution of the corrected visual acuity had three peaks. The first range was the sum of the visual acuity in both eyes was 0 to 0.01; the second range was that one eye was the corrected visual acuity of 0 and the other eye was more than 0.1; and the third range was that the corrected visual acuity was 0.1 to 0.3 in both eyes.

Conclusions: : Our analysis could suggest that we propose to renewal the criterion of visual disability certification, the 6th grade of classification, to "The sum of the corrected visual acuity of both eyes is more than 0.21, but less than 0.4".

Keywords: low vision • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • visual acuity 
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