May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Suppression of Fixational Eye Movements
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. B. Kaufman
    The Laboratory of Visual and Ocular Motor Physiology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • X. Shi
    Tianjin Eye Hospital, Tianjin, China
  • K. Yarvocik
    The Laboratory of Visual and Ocular Motor Physiology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • R. W. Hertle
    The Laboratory of Visual and Ocular Motor Physiology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • K. Zhao
    Tianjin Eye Hospital, Tianjin, China
  • D. Yang
    The Laboratory of Visual and Ocular Motor Physiology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.B. Kaufman, None; X. Shi, None; K. Yarvocik, None; R.W. Hertle, None; K. Zhao, None; D. Yang, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant 5R03EY015797 and a grant from Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 129. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      M. B. Kaufman, X. Shi, K. Yarvocik, R. W. Hertle, K. Zhao, D. Yang; Suppression of Fixational Eye Movements. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):129. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Involuntary fixational eye movements or microsaccades are postulated to be essential for maintaining clear vision. Using eye movement monitoring, we established a method to suppress microsaccades in order to study visual function under saccade-free conditions.

Methods: : Subjects with normal vision participated in the study. Mechanical restriction was accomplished by fitting an eye coil (Skalar) attached to a handle that could be gently held on the eye without disturbing vision. Binocular eye movements were monitored and digitized using video ocular tracking technology (Eyelink1000) in two different visual conditions: 1) binocular fixation of a 0.5º dot and 2) both eyes in the dark. The frequency of the microsaccades was quantified and compared with control conditions.

Results: : The frequency of the microsaccades in the restricted eyes was reduced by more than 80 percent during binocular fixation conditions and more than 60 percent during dark conditions. The most notable finding is that microsaccades were similarly suppressed in the unrestricted eye in both conditions.

Conclusions: : The monocular mechanical damping has binocular suppression effects on microsaccades. We hypothesize that proprioceptive information plays a role in binocular suppression of microsaccades in dark conditions. This method of mechanical damping is an effective way of suppressing microsaccades while preserving visual function.

Keywords: eye movements: saccades and pursuits • eye movements: conjugate • visual acuity 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×