May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Interest of Cerebral MRI in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. Denis
    Ophthalmology, Hopital Nord, Marseille, France
  • E. Toesca
    Ophthalmology, Hopital Nord, Marseille, France
  • E. Zanin
    Ophthalmology, Hopital Nord, Marseille, France
  • S. Guigou
    Ophthalmology, Hopital Nord, Marseille, France
  • N. Girard
    Neuro-radiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D. Denis, None; E. Toesca, None; E. Zanin, None; S. Guigou, None; N. Girard, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 138. doi:https://doi.org/
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      D. Denis, E. Toesca, E. Zanin, S. Guigou, N. Girard; Interest of Cerebral MRI in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):138. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) may be present at birth but usually develops during infancy. The aim of this study was to present the results of MRI in the INS.

Methods: : prospective study from 2000 to 2007 with inclusion of 75 patients presenting INS who also had cerebral MRI (average age of MRI: 12.50 months). Three groups of patients with INS were individualized: group 1 (n=34) - neurologic nystagmus (associated with neurological context: fetal suffering, psychomotor retardation, epilepsy.); group 2 (n=23) - sensory nystagmus (with disease of visual system), group 3 (n=18): isolated nystagmus (idiopathic and hereditary). Nystagmus (waveform, orientation) and MRI signs were analysed. MRI was read by a single neuroradiologist experienced in pediatric MRI (NG). MRI results were classified as follow: 1.ventricular dilatations, 2.enlarged subarachnoid and Virchow-Robin spaces, 3.white matter signal abnormalities, 4. hemispheric malformations (corpus callosum, septum pellucidum….), 5. brainstem abnormalities (including brainstem malformations), 6. cerebellar abnormalities.

Results: : the mean age of the onset of nystagmus was 2.8 months. The nystagmus was always conjugate and mainly horizontal 75%, vertical 18%, torsional 7%. The waveform of the nystagmus was pendular in 58%, jerk in 24%, combined pendular-jerk in 18%. MRI showed: 1. ventricular dilatations in 63% (of whom the nystagmus was neurologic in 56%, sensory in 28%, isolated in 16%); 2. enlarged subarachnoid and Virchow-Robin spaces in 70% (of whom the 57% neurologic, 25% sensory, 18% isolated); 3. white matter signal abnormalities in 55 % (of whom the nystagmus was neurologic in 64%, sensory in 18%, isolated in 18%); 4. hemispheric malformations in 15% (of whom the nystagmus was neurologic in 84%, sensory in 16%); 5. brainstem abnormalities in 45% (of whom the nystagmus was neurologic in 56%, sensory in 25%, isolated in 19%); cerebellar abnormalities in 38% (of whom the nystagmus was neurologic in 80%, sensory in 7%, isolated in 13%). MRI results according to the three groups showed a statistical correlation between the percentage of pathological MRI and each type of group of patients.

Keywords: imaging/image analysis: clinical • nystagmus • visual impairment: neuro-ophthalmological disease 
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