May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Capsular Washing to Prevent Posterior Capsular Opacification in a Rabbit Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. W. Jackson
    Ophthalmology, Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • M. C. Callegan
    Ophthalmology, Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • N. Mamalis
    Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • M. Dittmar
    Ophthalmology, Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.W. Jackson, Alcon, C; Alcon, R; M.C. Callegan, Alcon, Allergan, Advanced Medical Optics, C; N. Mamalis, Alcon, C; M. Dittmar, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH CORE grant (EY12191), Unrestricted Grant from Research to Prevent Blindness to DMEI
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 390. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      D. W. Jackson, M. C. Callegan, N. Mamalis, M. Dittmar; Capsular Washing to Prevent Posterior Capsular Opacification in a Rabbit Model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):390. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : This study was designed to test the ability of a novel capsular washing device to remove lens epithelial cells, and prevent posterior capsular opacification following cataract extraction in a rabbit model.

Methods: : Two experiments were conducted. Albino rabbits (14 New Zealand white, 2-2.5 kg) were purchased from a local vendor and maintained in the Dean A. McGee Eye Institute vivarium for 3-4 days prior to any experimentation. The rabbits then underwent lens extraction during which the crystalline lenses and cortical material were removed from all eyes of all rabbits. After cataract extraction all right eyes underwent capsular washing (N=14 eyes) and all left eyes were left untreated OS (N=14 fellow eyes). The rabbits were euthanized directly after surgery, their eyes were removed, and the presence of remaining lens epithelial cells in the capsular bag were assessed grossly and microscopically using a hematoxylin-eosin stain. The anterior segment was sectioned in ten parallel planes and the presence of equatorial lens epithelial cells and cortex were graded on a 0 - 3+ scale. To determine the effect on posterior capsular opacification 7 additional rabbits were procured and underwent lens extraction and capsular washing as the rabbits in the first experiment. However, intraocular lenses were inserted and the rate of posterior capsular opacification was followed photographically over 1 month. All eyes were harvested at 4 weeks post-surgery and the presence of remaining lens epithelial cells in the capsular bag was assessed grossly and microscopically after hematoxylin-eosin stain.

Results: : In the first experiment, 11 of 12 control eyes showed 360 degrees of grade 2 to 3+ lens epithelial cell remaining while 4 of 11 eyes that received capsular washing had no equatorial lens epithelial cells remaining. Additionally, Five of eleven test eyes had 90 to 180 degrees of 2 to 3+ equatorial lens epithelial cells remaining while only two eyes that underwent capsular washing had 360 degrees of equatorial lens epithelial cells remaining. In the second experiment, 5 out of 7 and 6 out of 7 capsule washed eyes showed less cortical remnant and fewer LEC compared to control eyes, respectively. Less vitreous inflammation and fewer iridolenticular adhesions were also noted in the groups of eyes that received capsular washing.

Conclusions: : In this rabbit model, eyes that were treated with the capsular washing device had fewer retained equatorial lens epithelial cells and cortex, less anterior segment and vitreous inflammation, and visibly less posterior capsular opacification.

Keywords: cataract • inflammation • proliferation 
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