May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Evaluation of Treatment for Subretinal Neovascularization From Pulsed Nd-YAG Laser Injury in the Non-Human Primate
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H. D. Hacker
    Ophthalmologist/Research, USAMRD - WRAIR, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • J. Brown
    Ophthalmologist/Research, USAMRD - WRAIR, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • J. Lund
    Ophthalmologist/Research, USAMRD - WRAIR, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • R. Cheramie
    Ophthalmologist/Research, USAMRD - WRAIR, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • B. Stuck
    Ophthalmologist/Research, USAMRD - WRAIR, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  H.D. Hacker, None; J. Brown, None; J. Lund, None; R. Cheramie, None; B. Stuck, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  MRMC DOD
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 535. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      H. D. Hacker, J. Brown, J. Lund, R. Cheramie, B. Stuck; Evaluation of Treatment for Subretinal Neovascularization From Pulsed Nd-YAG Laser Injury in the Non-Human Primate. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):535. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate a variety of treatment interventions for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the non-human primate from pulsed Nd-YAG laser injury as this class of laser is commonly deployed in a multitude of military and commercial laser systems. In contrast to lesions produced by continuous laser energy, pulsed laser lesions are frequently associated with significant retinal disruption and vitreous hemorrhage. For this reason, the natural history of CNV from pulsed laser injury may differ from subretinal neovascularization produced by continuous laser exposure.

Methods: : Utilizing optimal parameters to produce CNV in cynomologous monkeys (macaca fasicularis) photodynamic therapy with verteporphin was compared to treatment with anti-inflammatory therapy using steroid and non-steroidal drug (NSAID) treatment. We also anticipate comparison of PDT to vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. Fluorescein angiography, high resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT), and histopathology were employed to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment interventions.

Results: : PDT with standard application of 83 seconds of 689nm laser light resulted in consistent ablation of CNV. Such treatment also appeared to reduce subretinal scarring and attenuation of overlying neurosensory retina whereas treatment with intracameral steroid medication (triamcinolone) or parenteral non-steroidal medication (ketorolac) did not appear to have a significant effect on resolution of CNV. Comparison of mean values of photoreceptor signal intensity on OCT showed enhanced preservation of this layer with PDT versus steroid and NSAID medication.

Conclusions: : CNV from pulsed Nd-YAG laser energy responds favorably to PDT versus treatment with steroid or NSAID drug therapy alone. In addition, PDT appears to enhance preservation of photoreceptor elements in the setting of CNV from pulsed Nd-YAG laser injury.

Keywords: choroid: neovascularization • photodynamic therapy • corticosteroids 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×