May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
The Evaluation of Fully Automated Kinetic Perimetry With Computur Simulated Virtual Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. Hashimoto
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
  • C. Matsumoto
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
  • U. Schiefer
    Department of Pathophysiology of Vision and Neuro-ophthalmology, University Eye Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany
  • J. Paetzold
    Department of Pathophysiology of Vision and Neuro-ophthalmology, University Eye Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany
  • E. Krapp
    Department of Pathophysiology of Vision and Neuro-ophthalmology, University Eye Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany
  • B. Selig
    Department of Pathophysiology of Vision and Neuro-ophthalmology, University Eye Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany
  • Y. Shimomura
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S. Hashimoto, None; C. Matsumoto, None; U. Schiefer, None; J. Paetzold, None; E. Krapp, None; B. Selig, None; Y. Shimomura, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 1072. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      S. Hashimoto, C. Matsumoto, U. Schiefer, J. Paetzold, E. Krapp, B. Selig, Y. Shimomura; The Evaluation of Fully Automated Kinetic Perimetry With Computur Simulated Virtual Patients. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):1072. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate our fully automated kinetic algorithm (Program K) using computer- simulated virtual patients.

Methods: : Our new kinetic algorithm assesses the abnormality of isopter patterns using the external angles of patient response points. In this study, we tested this algorithm on a simulation computer program for training Octopus kinetic perimetry (K-Train) developed by Tuebingen University. First, one hundred eyes with visual field (VF) loss results of various origin were obtained by Goldmann manual kinetic perimetery (MKP) and were then digitized in K-Train. Next, Program K was applied to virtual patients by using K-Train. VF loss was assessed by using the following stimulus characteristics: V/4e, III/4e, I/4e, I/3e, I/2e, I/1e and a target speed of 3 degrees/sec. The results of Program K were compared with those of the digitized Goldmann MKP. In order to compare their location and size, the isopters of the digitized Goldmann MKP and Program K were then superimposed. The area of intersection could then be expressed as a percentage of the union area. The area and position of the isopters for a defined stimulus condition were compared between methods. Test duration was also evaluated.

Results: : Our results indicated that the isopter shape and size of Program K were comparable to those of digitized Goldmann MKP. The ratio of intersection area to union area for each isopter was 84 % (V/4e), 83 % (III/4e), 78 % (I/4e), 71% (I/3e), 60 % (I/2e) and 50% (I /1e). The average ratio of intersection area to union area of all isopters was 71%. The average examination duration was 18.1±3.2 minutes for Program K.

Conclusions: : Program K was shown to be a useful tool for assessing a variety of visual field defects on computer-simulated virtual patients.

Keywords: visual fields • perimetry • development 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×