May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Comparison of Uveitis Patients With and Without Elevated Intraocular Pressure
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T.-A. Yang
    Ophthalmology, Proctor Foundation, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California
  • S. C. Lin
    Ophthalmology, Proctor Foundation, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California
  • N. R. Acharya
    Ophthalmology, Proctor Foundation, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Yang, None; S.C. Lin, None; N.R. Acharya, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research to Prevent Blindness Career Development Award NEI K23EY017897
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 812. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      T.-A. Yang, S. C. Lin, N. R. Acharya; Comparison of Uveitis Patients With and Without Elevated Intraocular Pressure. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):812. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate the prevalence of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in uveitis patients and to determine associated clinical characteristics.

Methods: : Medical records of uveitis patients seen at the Proctor Foundation between July and December 2007 were reviewed. Clinical characteristics of patients with and without elevated IOP (> 21 mm Hg) were compared using Fisher’s exact test.

Results: : 69 of 205 (34%) uveitic patients developed elevated IOP. Of these 69, the average age was 41.7 years (range 4-86), and 45 (65%) were female. The uveitis course was most commonly chronic (64, 93%), and rarely acute (2, 3%) or recurrent (3, 4%). Laterality was 22 (32%) unilateral and 23 (33%) were classified as granulomatous. Location of the inflammation was most commonly anterior (34, 49%), followed by posterior/panuveitis (30, 43%), then intermediate (4, 6%). All patients required medical treatment for elevated IOP, but 27 (39%) also required laser peripheral iridotomy or surgery. Associated diagnoses included: idiopathic (35, 51%), HLA-B27 (5, 7%), sarcoidosis (5, 7%), herpes (4, 6%), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA; 4, 6%), tuberculosis (3, 4%) and other (13, 19%).136 of 205 (66%) of uveitic patients did not develop elevated IOP. The average age was 41.4 years (range 8-83), and 89 (65%) were female. The course seen was more commonly chronic (90, 66%), followed by recurrent (31, 23%), then acute (15, 11%). 46 (34%) had unilateral disease and 27 (20%) were classified as granulomatous. Location of the inflammation was most commonly anterior (68, 50%), then posterior/panuveitis (42, 31%), intermediate (15, 11%), and other (scleritis, keratitis) (11, 8%). Diagnoses included: idiopathic (62, 46%), HLA-B27 (17, 13%), sarcoidosis (8, 6%), herpes (6, 4%), JIA (6, 4%), multifocal choroiditis (4, 3%), sympathetic ophthalmia (3, 2%), and other (30, 22%).Uveitis course and type of inflammation were significantly associated with elevated IOP. IOP was significantly different depending on uveitis course (P < 0.001), with high IOP most common in patients with chronic inflammation. Granulomatous uveitis was also significantly associated with high IOP (P = 0.04). Laterality, location of inflammation and diagnosis were not significantly associated with development of high IOP.

Keywords: uveitis-clinical/animal model • intraocular pressure 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×