May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Evaluation of Second Generation Modified Portable Digital Camera for Documentation of Retinal Pathology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. C. Patel
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida
  • V. Brar
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida
  • S. Gupta
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida
  • K. V. Chalam
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.C. Patel, None; V. Brar, None; S. Gupta, None; K.V. Chalam, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 918. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      M. C. Patel, V. Brar, S. Gupta, K. V. Chalam; Evaluation of Second Generation Modified Portable Digital Camera for Documentation of Retinal Pathology. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):918. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate a second generation modified digital camera system for posterior segment photography and routine screening of retinal disorders in primary care clinics.

Methods: : Based on the principle of an indirect ophthalmoscope, a compound lens consisting of two optical elements (A 90 D and 20 D lens) was attached to a digital camera, resulting in an upright image. The aforementioned lens elements were adjusted to juxtapose the respective light reflexes and to increase the field of view. Further, a 8.3 megapixel digital camera has replaced the original 7.3 megapixel camera. At 14.1 mm long, 9.6 mm wide, and 7.9 mm tall, the second generation is also smaller than the original version.

Results: : We successfully examined over 100 patients with the 2nd generation camera. Reduced light reflexes from the lens elements allowed for detailed images of the fundus to be obtained with greater ease and less adjustments. The expanded field of view extended several disc diameters beyond the arcades in all quadrants.

Conclusions: : This second generation camera maintains its portability, functioning with a slit lamp or tripod, while affording greater resolution and width of field compared with the original. It is compact and user friendly, yet remains cost-effective,making it a useful tool for screening in the primary care setting.

Keywords: imaging/image analysis: clinical • retina • diabetic retinopathy 
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