May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Characterization of Type 3 Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H. F. Fine
    Ophthalmology, Harkness Eye Institute, Columiba Univ., New York, New York
  • E. Kim
    Ophthalmology, Harkness Eye Institute, Columiba Univ., New York, New York
  • R. F. Spaide
    Ophthalmology, Vitreous Retina Macula Consultants NY, New York, New York
  • L. A. Yannuzzi
    Ophthalmology, Vitreous Retina Macula Consultants NY, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  H.F. Fine, None; E. Kim, None; R.F. Spaide, None; L.A. Yannuzzi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Heed Foundation Fellowship and a grant from the Macula Foundation, Inc.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 971. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      H. F. Fine, E. Kim, R. F. Spaide, L. A. Yannuzzi; Characterization of Type 3 Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):971. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Recently, Yannuzzi and colleagues described a revised classification system for acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Type III AZOOR in this classification scheme includes those cases which initially present as a white spot syndrome. The purpose of this study is to characterize the clinical, angiographic, electrophysiologic, and autofluorescence findings of patients with Type III AZOOR.

Methods: : A multi-center, retrospective review was performed to gather available documentation on cases of purported AZOOR. Cases were reviewed by a single examiner to determine if they met the clinical and imaging criteria for AZOOR.

Results: : Of all reviewed cases, 161 met the diagnostic criteria of AZOOR. Three cases had evidence of a preceding white spot syndrome and were classified as Type III. The age range was 29 - 51 years. These cases all resembled the multifocal evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) on presentation, with small white migratory spots about the posterior pole that resolved leaving residual foveal granularity. In one patient, the pattern of hyperautofluorescence on presentation coincided with the subsequent area of involvement of AZOOR. In another, the syndrome followed placement of a purified protein derivative (PPD) skin test. All cases of Type III AZOOR developed zones of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, progressive visual field loss, and electroretinographic abnormalities.

Conclusions: : Antecedent white spot syndromes were rare (1.9%) in a series of 161 patients diagnosed with AZOOR. Autofluorescence findings in MEWDS can foreshadow the development of AZOOR.

Keywords: autoimmune disease • chorioretinitis • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×