May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Evaluation of Prescription Lenses That Correct Higher Order Optical Aberrations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T. Kuyk
    Northrop Grumman, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • L. McLin
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • J. Kent
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • L. Barnes
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • J. Dykes
    Northrop Grumman, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • P. Garcia
    Northrop Grumman, Brooks City-Base, Texas
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Kuyk, None; L. McLin, None; J. Kent, None; L. Barnes, None; J. Dykes, None; P. Garcia, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Air Force Research Laboratory
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 992. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      T. Kuyk, L. McLin, J. Kent, L. Barnes, J. Dykes, P. Garcia; Evaluation of Prescription Lenses That Correct Higher Order Optical Aberrations. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):992.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To determine if prescription lenses that incorporate a correction for higher order optical aberrations in addition to lower order aberrations provide wearers visual advantages over traditional prescription eyewear.

 
Methods:
 

Using a within-subjects experimental design and a blind randomized treatment order, visual performance of 20 subjects (mean age = 30.5) was compared while wearing iZon® wavefront-corrected lenses (Ophthonix, Inc.) and traditional prescription lenses (plano lenses if the subject was emmetropic). Visual acuity was assessed with high (96%) and low (11%) contrast letter charts (Regan charts) at mean luminance (white portion) of 100 and 3 cd•m-². In addition contrast sensitivity was assessed at 5 spatial frequencies (0.9, 3, 6, 12, 18 cpd) using a staircase procedure at grating mean luminance (5o gabor patches) of 30 and 3 cd•m-². Subjects were tested twice, when the lenses were issued and at a minimum of 2 weeks later.

 
Results:
 

Average acuity for the high contrast letters with the traditional lenses (plano for emmetropes) was 20/11.5 and 20/14.8 at 100 and 3 cd•m-² compared with 20/11.4 and 20/15.1 with the Izon® lenses. None of the differences were significant. With the low contrast letter charts, acuity was reduced (approximately 20/18 and 20/30 at 100 and 3 cd•m-²) but like the high contrast condition no differences between the traditional and Izon® lenses were found. Similarly, in the contrast sensitivity data no significant differences between the traditional and Izon® lenses were found at any spatial frequency at either 30 or 3 cd•m-² (Figure 1).

 
Conclusions:
 

When assessed with standard techniques, the Izon® lenses did not provide wearers any visual advantage over traditional lenses. One caveat in generalizing these results is that the sample tested consisted of a significant number of young US Air Force personnel who had exceptionally good corrected or uncorrected acuities even under low light test conditions and thus there may have been little room for measurable improvement.  

 
Keywords: aberrations • spectacle lens • contrast sensitivity 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×