May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Prevalence of Anisometropia in Infants and Young Children: The Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Borchert
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • J. Lin
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • K. Tarczy-Hornoch
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • S. Cotter
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • M. Torres
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • S. Azen
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • R. Varma
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • MEPEDS Group
    Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Borchert, None; J. Lin, None; K. Tarczy-Hornoch, None; S. Cotter, None; M. Torres, None; S. Azen, None; R. Varma, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grants EY-14472, EY-03040, and unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 1453. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      M. Borchert, J. Lin, K. Tarczy-Hornoch, S. Cotter, M. Torres, S. Azen, R. Varma, MEPEDS Group; Prevalence of Anisometropia in Infants and Young Children: The Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):1453. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine age- and ethnicity-related anisometropia prevalence in 6-72 month old Hispanic and African-American children.

Methods: : A population-based cohort of 6- to 72-month-old children underwent Retinomax autorefraction 30-60 minutes after cycloplegia with 1% cyclopentolate (0.5% if ≤12 months). Retinoscopy was performed if autorefraction was unsuccessful. Noncycloplegic retinoscopy was performed if drops were refused. The prevalence of anisometropia by spherical equivalent (SE) and by difference in plus cylinder in any axis (cylindrical) was determined for age, gender and ethnicity.

Results: : 3024 Hispanic and 2993 African-American children were tested. Overall the prevalence of SE anisometropia ≥1.0D was 4.0% for Hispanics; 4.2% for African Americans. Prevalence of SE anisometropia ≥3.0D was 0.1% for Hispanics; 0.3% for African Americans. Prevalence of cylindrical anisometropia ≥1.0D was 5.4% and 4.5%, respectively. Cylindrical anisometropia ≥3.0D was 0.1% and 0%, respectively. SE anisometropia decreased with age in Hispanics (p=0.01 trend test) but not African Americans (p=0.5). Cylindrical anisometropia decreased with age in both ethnic groups (p=.003 and 0.0003). There was no significant difference in anisometropia between ethnic groups after adjusting for age (p=0.77 for SE; 0.10 for cylindrical). Anisometropia did not vary by gender.

Conclusions: : Cylindrical and/or SE anisometropia (≥1.0D) affects 5-10% of Hispanic and African-American preschoolers. Anisometropia ≥3.0D is rare. SE anisometropia decreases in prevalence with age in Hispanics, but not in African-Americans suggesting a possible genetic role in interocular refractive disparity.

Keywords: refractive error development • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence 
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