May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Ex vivo Changes in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Autofluorescence With Light Exposure
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. J. Hunter
    University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
    Center for Visual Science,
  • J. I. W. Morgan
    University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
    Institute of Optics & Center for Visual Science,
  • R. Wolfe
    University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
    Center for Visual Science,
  • J. R. Sparrow
    Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, New York
  • D. R. Williams
    University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
    Institute of Optics & Center for Visual Science,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.J. Hunter, Bausch & Lomb, F; J.I.W. Morgan, Bausch & Lomb, F; dual wavelength imaging, P; R. Wolfe, Bausch & Lomb, F; J.R. Sparrow, None; D.R. Williams, Bausch & Lomb, Optos, C; adaptive optics, dual wavelength imaging, P; Bausch & Lomb, F.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Bausch & Lomb, NIH EY014375, NIH EY01319, NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics (coop. agr. no.: AST-9876783 with UCSC), NEI Training grant EY07125, and Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 1843. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      J. J. Hunter, J. I. W. Morgan, R. Wolfe, J. R. Sparrow, D. R. Williams; Ex vivo Changes in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Autofluorescence With Light Exposure. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):1843. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : We previously described a reduction and subsequent recovery of macaque retinal pigment epithelial cell autofluorescence (AF) in vivo following exposure to visible light. To clarify whether these changes reflect the intrinsic properties of the fluorophores responsible for AF or are caused by other retinal changes (such as a light-induced migration of a screening pigment), we investigated whether similar AF changes could also be observed in two different ex vivo preparations.

Methods: : Fixed tissue was imaged in the same adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope used in the in vivo studies. Flat-mounted human RPE slides (retina removed) or fixed cultured A2E-laden ARPE19 cells were placed in the retinal plane of a model eye and exposed to light of various powers, durations, and wavelengths from the visible to the infrared. Images were acquired before, immediately after, and up to 24 hours after the light exposure. AF changes were quantified by the normalized ratio of AF intensity inside the exposed area to control regions immediately outside the exposed area.

Results: : The in vivo and ex vivo experiments produced results that were similar in several respects. Both revealed a reduction in AF immediately following visible light exposure, but not with intense infrared exposure. Both showed reciprocity of power and duration, indicative of a photochemical rather than thermal origin for the effect. Both showed some recovery of AF subsequent to the reduction that immediately followed light exposure, though only partial recovery was observed in the ex vivo case. To produce the same AF reduction, roughly 10 times greater retinal irradiance was required in the in vivo case relative to the two ex vivo preparations.

Conclusions: : The similarities between the in vivo and ex vivo results suggest that the metabolic activity of the living retina is not required to produce the immediate light-dependent reduction in AF and suggests that the effect reflects an intrinsic property of the fluorophores involved. One possible mechanism is the photooxidation of lipofuscin, which could have damaging consequences for the retina. If this is the mechanism, the fact that the living eye is 10 times less sensitive to AF changes and that it shows a complete, rather than a partial, recovery of AF intensity suggests that there may be metabolic mechanisms that actively protect against light-induced changes in lipofuscin.

Keywords: retinal pigment epithelium • radiation damage: light/UV • imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×