May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Changes in Lens Thickness Over a Ten Year Interval: The Beaver Dam Eye Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • B. E. K. Klein
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin
  • K. E. Lee
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin
  • R. Klein
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  B.E.K. Klein, None; K.E. Lee, None; R. Klein, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EY06594 and, in part, by Research to Prevent Blindness (R. Klein, BEK Klein, Senior Scientific Investigator Awards, New York, NY)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 1935. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      B. E. K. Klein, K. E. Lee, R. Klein; Changes in Lens Thickness Over a Ten Year Interval: The Beaver Dam Eye Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):1935. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate the change in lens thickness over a ten year interval.

Methods: : Study examinations of the Beaver Dam Eye Study cohort pertinent to this analysis occurred at baseline (1988-2000) and ten years later. During the course of the study visit, a medical history was obtained and an eye examination was performed. Slit lamp color photographs were taken after pupil dilation. Slit lamp images were digitized in grey scale. A custom designed program detected lens landmarks along the axis through the center of the lens. The location of these landmarks, in particular those delineating the anterior and posterior capsule of the lens, serve as the basis of the measurements we report. The 10-year change in lens thickness was calculated as the percentage of change relative to the baseline lens thickness.

Results: : For women and men who were 43-54 years of age at baseline, the mean 10-year change in lens thickness was 4.2% for each gender; for those 55-64 years of age, the change was 2.4% for women and 3.8% for men; for those 65-74 years of age, the change was 2.3% for women and 3.8% for men; and for those 75 years of age or older, the change was 3.0% for women and 4.0% for men. In multivariable analysis including age (as a continuous variable), gender, smoking status, diabetes status, nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular cataract status in the model, only older age (p<.0001) and gender (being female, p=.012) were significantly associated with change in lens thickness.

Conclusions: : Age is the most important correlate of lens thickness and its effect varies by gender. While the mechanisms responsible for these changes are not well known, this change may be a marker of biological aging.

Keywords: aging • cataract • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×