May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Femtosecond Laser-Assisted Keratoplasty: Wound Shapes, Surgical Technique and Image Analysis in Eye Bank Globes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. B. Malta
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center/ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • M. Banitt
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center/ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • H. Soong
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center/ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • R. Shtein
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center/ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • D. Musch
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center/ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • A. Sugar
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center/ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • S. Mian
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center/ University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.B. Malta, None; M. Banitt, None; H. Soong, None; R. Shtein, None; D. Musch, None; A. Sugar, None; S. Mian, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 1959. doi:https://doi.org/
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      J. B. Malta, M. Banitt, H. Soong, R. Shtein, D. Musch, A. Sugar, S. Mian; Femtosecond Laser-Assisted Keratoplasty: Wound Shapes, Surgical Technique and Image Analysis in Eye Bank Globes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):1959. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To optimize the surgical technique for performing femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty (FLAK) using the Intralase FS to cut both recipient and donor cornea buttons in eye bank globes.

Methods: : Thirty eye bank globes and 30 corneoscleral buttons were used to perform FLAK in 6 globes and 6 corneoscleral buttons measured for each of the following trephination patterns: top hat, mushroom, zigzag and vertical cuts. In addition, mechanical trephination was performed in 6 globes and 6 corneoscleral buttons. The integrity of the incisions was tested with 8 sutures, 8 sutures with fibrin glue and 16 sutures by measuring the intraocular pressure required to produce graft-host wound leakage and dehiscence (IOPL). Light microscopic histology and scanning electron microscopy were performed to assess surface quality and graft-host interface regularity.

Results: : Mushroom patterned FLAK had higher IOPL than mechanical trephination, vertical and zigzag pattern for suture technique (p<0.05). There was no difference in IOPL with mushroom, top hat and zigzag patterns when comparing 8 sutures plus fibrin glue to 16 suture wound closure technique (p>0.05). Light microscopic histology and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the cut surfaces were of very good quality with straight and orthogonal edges with minimal collateral laser damage.

Conclusions: : Patterns FLAK may be provide grader wound stability than mechanical trephination and vertical pattern FLAK.

Keywords: transplantation • shape and contour • laser 
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