May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Assessment of Wound Strength of Corneal Lacerations Repaired in vitro With Either Bioglue®, Dermabond®, or Nylon Sutures
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. E. Keshet
    Ophthalmology, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, New York
  • M. B. Hymowitz
    Ophthalmology, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, New York
  • H. M. Engel
    Ophthalmology, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.E. Keshet, None; M.B. Hymowitz, None; H.M. Engel, BioGlue was provided through funding by CryoLife Inc., F.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 2291. doi:https://doi.org/
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      M. E. Keshet, M. B. Hymowitz, H. M. Engel; Assessment of Wound Strength of Corneal Lacerations Repaired in vitro With Either Bioglue®, Dermabond®, or Nylon Sutures. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):2291. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To compare the efficacy of BioGlue® (Purified bovine serum albumin and gluteraldehyde) to Dermabond® (2-Octyl Cynoacrylate) and nylon sutures in sealing corneal lacerations in vitro. To our knowledge, the use of BioGlue® for corneal laceration repair has not been studied.

Methods: : An 11-blade scalpel was used to create linear 4 mm, full-thickness lacerations 2 mm anterior to the corneal limbus, in 36 fresh porcine eyes. The eyes were then randomized into three groups: 12 lacerations were repaired with interrupted 10-0 nylon sutures (2 mm bites, spaced 1 mm apart), 12 were sealed with a drop of BioGlue® , and 12 were sealed with a drop of Dermabond®. Fluorescein-stained balanced salt solution was injected into each eye with a 23-gauge syringe, while a Weck Cell® was placed along the wound edge. A Tonopen® reading of intraocular pressure (mm Hg) was obtained at the moment fluorescein stain appeared on the Weck Cell®. The pressures for each treatment group were averaged and compared using a two-tailed paired t-test.

Results: : The mean intraocular pressure for leakage was 22.2 mm Hg (SD+/- 4.2) in eyes repaired with nylon sutures, 57.0 mm Hg (SD +/- 10.6) for those repaired with BioGlue®, and 64.6mm Hg (SD +/- 15.3) for those repaired with Dermabond®. The difference in intraocular pressure between the suture- and BioGlue®-treated eyes was statistically significant (p=0.006). However, it was not significant between the BioGlue®- and Dermabond®-treated eyes (p=0.495).

Conclusions: : BioGlue® was superior to 10-0 nylon sutures in sealing corneal lacerations under greater intraocular pressures. Although Dermabond®-sealed wounds withstood a slightly higher intraocular pressure on average than BioGlue®-sealed wounds, the difference was not statistically significant. If otherwise safe for human use, BioGlue® may be considered as an alternative to nylon sutures in repairing corneal lacerations.

Keywords: cornea: clinical science • wound healing • trauma 
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