May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Correlation Between the Levels of Air Pollution With the Hyperplasia of Goblet Cells in Human Conjunctiva During the Last 7 Years in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires, Argentina
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • I. Berra
    Ocular Laboratory, Biofundus, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • L. Dawidowski
    Environmental Monitoring Group, Chemistry Activity Unit,, Atomic Energy National Commission, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • P. Novaes
    Ophthalmology, Laboratory of Medical Investigation (LIM-33), University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • A. D' Angiola
    Environmental Monitoring Group, Chemistry Activity Unit,, Atomic Energy National Commission, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • N. Kara-jose
    Ophthalmology, Laboratory of Medical Investigation (LIM-33), University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • P. H. Saldiva
    Laboratory of Experimental Air Pollution (LIM05), University of Sao Paulo Medical School,, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • A. Berra
    Ophthalmology, Laboratory of Medical Investigation (LIM-33), University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil
    Laboratory of Ocular Investigation, Buenos Aires University, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  I. Berra, None; L. Dawidowski, None; P. Novaes, None; A. D' Angiola, None; N. Kara-jose, None; P.H. Saldiva, None; A. Berra, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 2374. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      I. Berra, L. Dawidowski, P. Novaes, A. D' Angiola, N. Kara-jose, P. H. Saldiva, A. Berra; Correlation Between the Levels of Air Pollution With the Hyperplasia of Goblet Cells in Human Conjunctiva During the Last 7 Years in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):2374. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the correlation between air pollution with the hyperplasia of conjunctival goblet cells (GC) in patients with ocular discomfort in the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires (MABA).

 
Methods:
 

We analyzed the impression cytology of 8,377 patients with symptoms of ocular discomfort, together with on-road mobile emissions of particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in MABA between 2000 to 2006. Nelson classification was used and we considered more than 300 GC in 10 high power fields (HPF) with 400X magnification as hyperplasia of GC. The PM and NOx annual emissions were computed by means of the 2006 MABA on-road mobile emission inventory, taking into consideration the fleet evolution through time as well as the incorporation of new vehicle technologieans. Locally-measured emission factors as well as those presented by the European COPERT III methodology were employed.

 
Results:
 

The levels of PM and NOx on-road mobile emissions in MABA increased significantly during the last seven years, PM: 3.4 to 4.0 gigagrams (Gg) and NOx: 64 to 76 Gg. In impression cytology samples, GC hyperplasia was also increased significantly between 5.75% to 18%.  

 
Conclusions:
 

The results suggest that the exposure to PM and NOx on-road mobile emissions induced a dose dependent GC conjunctival hyperplasia. These findings suggest that this event is an adaptive response of the conjunctival epithelium to chronic environmental injury. Nevertheless, this adaptation is not enough to inhibit the symptoms of ocular irritation.

 
Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment • ocular irritants • conjunctiva 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×