May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Comparison of Ganciclovir Ophthalmic Gel and Trifluridine Drops for the Treatment of Experimental Herpetic Keratitis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. D. Varnell
    Ophthalmology, LSU Eye Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • H. E. Kaufman
    Ophthalmology, LSU Eye Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  E.D. Varnell, Sirion Therapeutics, F; Sirion Therapeutics, C; H.E. Kaufman, Sirion Therapeutics, C.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grants EY002672 and EY002377, an unrestricted challenge grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc in New York, NY
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 2491. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      E. D. Varnell, H. E. Kaufman; Comparison of Ganciclovir Ophthalmic Gel and Trifluridine Drops for the Treatment of Experimental Herpetic Keratitis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):2491. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel (0.15%) was compared to trifluridine 0.1% ophthalmic solution for the treatment of herpetic keratitis in the New Zealand white rabbit.

Methods: : An initial masked, 14-day toxicity trial in non-infected rabbits showed that neither the ganciclovir gel, the placebo gel, or trifluridine drops produced corneal toxicity when administered five times per day. Another group of rabbits was infected with the McKrae strain of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1. Three days after infection, keratitis was graded, and rabbits were randomized to treatment with either ganciclovir gel, trifluridine drops, or placebo gel five times per day. Severity of the keratitis was graded daily in a masked manner.

Results: : Neither the trifluridine, ganciclovir gel nor the placebo gel were toxic to the rabbit cornea when applied five times a day for 14 days to non-infected eyes. In rabbits infected with McKrae HSV-1, there was no difference in the effect of the ganciclovir gel and the trifluridine drops for treating an established keratitis.

Conclusions: : Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel is as effective in treating established HSV-1 herpetic keratitis in the rabbit as trifluridine.

Keywords: antiviral drugs • herpes simplex virus • keratitis 
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