May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Visual Acuity, Visual Function and Myopia Among Rural Chinese Secondary School Children: The X-PRES Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Sharma
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Ophthalmology and Vision Science,
  • N. Congdon
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Ophthalmology and Vision Science,
  • Y. Wang
    Ophthalmology, JSIEC, Shantou, China
  • Y. Song
    Ophthalmology, JSIEC, Shantou, China
  • K. Choi
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics,,
  • M. Zhang
    Ophthalmology, JSIEC, Shantou, China
  • Z. Xie
    Ophthalmology, JSIEC, Shantou, China
  • L. Li
    Epidemiology, Shantou University School of Public Health, Shantou, China
  • X. Liu
    Epidemiology, Shantou University School of Public Health, Shantou, China
  • D. S. C. Lam
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Ophthalmology and Vision Science,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Sharma, None; N. Congdon, None; Y. Wang, None; Y. Song, None; K. Choi, None; M. Zhang, None; Z. Xie, None; L. Li, None; X. Liu, None; D.S.C. Lam, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Support for this study was provided by the Li Ka Shing Foundation, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Joint Shantou International Eye Center
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 2598. doi:https://doi.org/
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      A. Sharma, N. Congdon, Y. Wang, Y. Song, K. Choi, M. Zhang, Z. Xie, L. Li, X. Liu, D. S. C. Lam; Visual Acuity, Visual Function and Myopia Among Rural Chinese Secondary School Children: The X-PRES Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):2598. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

Though uncorrected refractive error is the leading cause of low vision among children in Asia, the impact of myopia on visual function has not been well-described in this setting. We sought to evaluate visual acuity, visual function and prevalence of refractive error among rural Chinese secondary-school children.

 
Methods:
 

Uncorrected, presenting and best-corrected visual acuity, cycloplegic auto-refraction with ophthalmologist's refinement and self-reported visual function using a standard instrument (Fletcher et al. Arch Ophthalmol 1997;115:767-774) were assessed in a random, cluster sample of students drawn from all secondary schools in the town of Xichang in Southern China.

 
Results:
 

Among 1892 subjects (97.3% of consenting children, 84.7% of total sample), mean age was 14.7 +/- 0.8 years, 51.2% were female and 26% were wearing glasses. The proportion of children with uncorrected, presenting and best-corrected low vision (<= 6/12 in the better eye) was 41.2%, 19.3% and 0.5% respectively. Myopia < -0.5D, < -2.0D and < -6.0D in both eyes was present in 62.3%, 31.5% and 1.8% of subjects respectively. Among children with low vision when tested without correction, 98.7% was due to refractive error, while only half of these children had appropriate correction. Girls had significantly (P < 0.001) more low vision and myopia than boys. More myopic refractive error was strongly associated with worse self-reported visual function (Correlation = 0.46, P < 0.001, Table 1).

 
Conclusions:
 

Visual disability in this population was common, highly correctable, and frequently un-corrected. The impact of refractive error on self-reported visual function was significant. Strategies and studies to understand and remove barriers to spectacle wear are needed.Table 1: Association between spherical equivalent (average between two eyes) and visual function score (ranges from 0 (worst) to 100 (best))  

 
Keywords: myopia • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials 
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