May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Intravitreal Bevacizumab Injection for Treatment of Macular Edema Due to Retinal Vein Occlusion in Previously Vitrectomized Eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K. Kure
    Toranomon Hospital, Minatoku, Japan
  • Y. Yanagi
    University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Bunkyoku, Japan
  • R. Obata
    University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Bunkyoku, Japan
  • Y. Inoue
    University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Bunkyoku, Japan
  • H. Takahashi
    University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Bunkyoku, Japan
  • A. Iriyama
    University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Bunkyoku, Japan
  • Y. Tamaki
    University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Bunkyoku, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  K. Kure, None; Y. Yanagi, None; R. Obata, None; Y. Inoue, None; H. Takahashi, None; A. Iriyama, None; Y. Tamaki, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 2717. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      K. Kure, Y. Yanagi, R. Obata, Y. Inoue, H. Takahashi, A. Iriyama, Y. Tamaki; Intravitreal Bevacizumab Injection for Treatment of Macular Edema Due to Retinal Vein Occlusion in Previously Vitrectomized Eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):2717. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate the short-term effect of intravitreal bevacizumab in eyes that had prior pars plana vitrectomy for treatment of macular edema due to retinal vein occlusion and eyes with no prior treatment for macular edema.

Methods: : Retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated with intravitreal bevacizumab injection for macular edema due to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) or branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) was conducted. All eyes were followed up for at least six months. Main outcome measures were the change in visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness as measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) at baseline and at final visit. Eyes were separated into 2 groups: previously treated and previously untreated for macular edema due to CRVO or BRVO and eyes with no prior treatment for macular edema.

Results: : Fourteen eyes of fourteen patients were included in this study; 7 were previously untreated and 7 previously treated. The interval between symptom onset and intravitreal bevacizumab injection was was 9.1 and 9.2 months in the previously vitrectomized group and untreated group, respectively. The beseline mean VA for vitrectomy group was 0.2 and 0.34 in the previously vitrectomized group and untreated group, respectively. Mean change in LogMAR VA was -0.19 and -0.24 in the previously vitrectomized group and untreated group, respectively. Mean central foveal thickness changed from 547µm to 195µm for previously untreated eyes and from 633µm to 437µm for the previously treated eyes.

Conclusions: : This data shows no significant difference in response to intravitreal bevacizumab between previously treated and untreated eyes for treatment of macular edema from RVO. The data suggests that previously untreated patients may respond better; a more clear relationship may be established with a larger sample size.

Keywords: vascular occlusion/vascular occlusive disease • vascular endothelial growth factor • injection 
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