May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Needs for Low Vision Rehabilitation in Urban China
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. Wang
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
  • X. Wang
    Ophthalmology, EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • J. Zhu
    Shanghai Municipal Center for Eye Disease Prevention and Treatment, Shanghai, China
  • J. Dai
    Ophthalmology, EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • H. Xu
    Ophthalmology, EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • F. Xue
    Ophthalmology, EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • R. Chu
    Ophthalmology, EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • X. Sun
    Ophthalmology, EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • R. W. Massof
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  L. Wang, None; X. Wang, None; J. Zhu, None; J. Dai, None; H. Xu, None; F. Xue, None; R. Chu, None; X. Sun, None; R.W. Massof, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Shanghai Changning Health Research Grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3150. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      L. Wang, X. Wang, J. Zhu, J. Dai, H. Xu, F. Xue, R. Chu, X. Sun, R. W. Massof; Needs for Low Vision Rehabilitation in Urban China. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3150. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To assess needs for low vision rehabilitation (LVR) in the urban population of visually impaired in China.

Methods: : Fifty seven low-vision patients, aged 6-85 yrs and with best-corrected visual acuity of the better eye ranging from 20/60 to no worse than light perception, were recruited at one tertiary and one secondary eye hospital in Shanghai, and were interviewed by trained surveyors using Needs for Low Vision Rehabilitation Questionnaire (NLVR) developed by the first author (LW). Socioeconomic and clinical information was also collected. NLVR included 7 questions covering four domains: Chief impact of vision impairment on quality of life (QOL), LVR awareness, willingness to receive LVR, and willingness to pay.

Results: : Among 57 participants, 21% were aged 6-20, 28% 21-55, 25% 56-70, and 26% 71+. Inability of reading (23%) and inconvenience of daily living (18%) were most frequent complaints. About 91% of the participants were unaware of LVR. About 89% of the participants were willing to receive LVR. The four leading motivations for LVR were to improve QOL (47%), to live independently (27%), to work (24%), and to go to school (20%). For the group of 6-20 yrs age, 83% were students ranging from elementary school to college. 100% of the students wanted LVR in order to pursue education. For those who wanted LVR for partial functional improvement, 55% of them were willing to pay 1000 CNY (135 USD) or more for assistive devices, 10% up to 500 CNY, 31% between 50 - 200 CNY, and 4% were not willing to pay. For those who were not willing to receive LVR (11%), the leading reason was that LVR is no use or even worse for the vision condition (50%).

Conclusions: : The results show that there are unmet needs for LVR in urban China. In particular, LVR quality and public LVR awareness need to be improved. Children are an important group for LVR because of their potential for pursuing education.

Keywords: low vision • quality of life 
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