May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Rapid Fluid Flow Across Mammalian Lens Surface During Accommodation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C.-W. Kong
    Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • R. Gerometta
    Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    Oftalmología, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Corrientes, Argentina
  • A. C. Zamudio
    Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • B. Wu
    Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • O. A. Candia
    Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C. Kong, None; R. Gerometta, None; A.C. Zamudio, None; B. Wu, None; O.A. Candia, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grants EY000160 and EY001867; and RPB, Inc
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3165. doi:https://doi.org/
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      C.-W. Kong, R. Gerometta, A. C. Zamudio, B. Wu, O. A. Candia; Rapid Fluid Flow Across Mammalian Lens Surface During Accommodation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3165. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Our recent work demonstrated that a volume change with fluid flow across the lens surface is involved in accommodation (Gerometta et al, Am J Physiol 293, 2007). Our purpose is to determine whether this fluid flow can occur in bovine and rabbit lenses during a physiologically relevant 200 ms period representative of in vivo accommodation.

Methods: : The iris-ciliary body-zonulae-lens complex (lens complex) was isolated from fresh bovine and rabbit eyes; the aqueous side of the ciliary body ring was attached with cyanoacrylate glue to a rubber washer with a central circular opening within which the lens was situated. The attached lens complex was then incubated in Ringer’s throughout the experimental procedure within a custom-built stretching device. The stretching device contained eight motors evenly mounted on a circular module. Radial stretching and relaxing actions of the motors, simulating disaccommodation and accommodation respectively, were transmitted to the lens complex via eight complementary metal hooks that clasped the pre-pierced outer edge of the rubber washer. The motors were synchronized and preprogrammed to coordinate with the shutter of a digital camera, which was aligned with its visual axis centered along the anterior-posterior axis of the lens, so that pictures of the entire anterior lens outline were captured at: 1) the naturally relaxed condition of an accommodated lens; 2) after the lens stretching was accomplished, increasing its mean equatorial diameter (ED); 3) 200 ms after the stretching force was instantaneously released; and 4) 5 s after the stretching force was released.

Results: : Upon the imposition of an average increase in ED of ≈ 3 % (corresponding to a volume decrease of ≈ 6 % in bovine) with respect to the relaxed condition, a photograph was taken; photographs taken 200 ms after the release of the stretching force showed that in the cow (n = 9), 90 % of the increased ED reverted to its relaxed control value, while in the rabbit (n = 9), 98 % of the increased ED returned to its control value. Total recoveries to the control ED values were seen in both species 5 s after the stretching force was released.

Conclusions: : Changes in lens volume observed with an in vitro model for accommodation occur within a physiologically relevant time frame, implying a rapid movement of fluid to and from the lens during accommodation.

Keywords: accomodation 
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