May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Changes in Peripheral Refractive Error Due to Accommodation and Higher Order Aberrations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. A. Clark
    School of Optometry, University of Indiana, Bloomington, Indiana
  • P. S. Soni
    School of Optometry, University of Indiana, Bloomington, Indiana
  • L. N. Thibos
    School of Optometry, University of Indiana, Bloomington, Indiana
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C.A. Clark, None; P.S. Soni, None; L.N. Thibos, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3326. doi:https://doi.org/
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      C. A. Clark, P. S. Soni, L. N. Thibos; Changes in Peripheral Refractive Error Due to Accommodation and Higher Order Aberrations. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3326. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Peripheral refractive error has been hypothesized to be a stimulus for myopia progression. In addition, myopia progression has been heavily associated with near work. To date, there is some question whether accommodation has an effect on peripheral refractive error as different studies have shown conflicting results. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of accommodation on peripheral refractive error.

Methods: : 20 subjects with refractive error in the range of +4.00 to -7.00 participated in this investigation. The Hartmann-Shack technique was used to measure the central and peripheral refractive error at ±30° in the nasal and temporal periphery along the horizontal meridian. A Badal optometer was installed to allow for targets at infinity and for a 3 diopter stimulus at near. Central and peripheral refractive error was measured with targets at distance and near.

Results: : Peripheral refractive error was highly variable between subjects. Spherical aberration was correlated with accommodative changes in peripheral refractive error and explains much of the variance. This correlation was consistent with similar changes in peripheral refractive error and spherical aberration such as in orthokeratology. No other higher order aberrations were correlated with changes in peripheral refraction.

Conclusions: : Changes in spherical aberration may have an association with changes in peripheral refractive error. If this is correct, it could explain some of the discrepancies between past studies. If peripheral refractive error is important for myopia progression, changes in spherical aberrations may be an important factor in determining progression.

Keywords: myopia • refractive error development • accomodation 
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