May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Topical Honey for the Treatment of Corneal Abrasions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. H. Uwaydat
    Ophthalmology, UAMS-Jones Eye Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • M. N. Wiggins
    Ophthalmology, UAMS-Jones Eye Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • P. Jha
    Ophthalmology, UAMS-Jones Eye Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • H. H. Brown
    Ophthalmology, UAMS-Jones Eye Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • N. S. Bora
    Ophthalmology, UAMS-Jones Eye Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S.H. Uwaydat, None; M.N. Wiggins, None; P. Jha, None; H.H. Brown, None; N.S. Bora, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Unrestricted grants from Research to Prevent Blindness and the Pat & Willard Walker Eye Research Center
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3406. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      S. H. Uwaydat, M. N. Wiggins, P. Jha, H. H. Brown, N. S. Bora; Topical Honey for the Treatment of Corneal Abrasions. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3406.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate the use of topical honey in the treatment of corneal abrasions.

Methods: : Animal study using 10 Lewis rats divided into 2 groups (Group A and Group B). After topical anesthesia, a #15 blade was used to remove the corneal epithelium in all the rats. The horizontal and vertical dimensions of the defects were measured with a surgical caliber, using the cobalt blue light and the magnification of a modified slit lamp. In Group A (5 rats),for each rat, one eye was treated with pure raw honey applied topically 3x/day, the other eye was treated with topical erythromycin applied 3x/day. In Group B (5 rats), for each rat, one eye was treated with topical honey applied 3x/day. The other eye did not recieve any treatment.The epithelial defects were created on Day 0 and measured through Day 4. On day 2 and Day 3, one rat from each group was sacrificed and the eyes sent for histologic evaluation. On Day 4, all rats were sacrificed. One pair of eyes from each group was submitted for immunologic evaluation. The remaining eyes were submitted for histologic evaluation.

Results: : -In Group A, the honey treated abrasion sizes decreased more than the erythromycin-treated abrasions at Day 2,3,4. The difference was statistically significant at Day 3 ( p=0.036). The overall mean change from baseline was significantly greater for the honey treated eyes than the erythromycin treated eyes (p=0.0022). In Group B, the honey treated abrasion sizes decreased more than the untreated abrasions overall. The difference was statistically significant only at Day 2 (p=0.035).-Histologic analysis of representative corneal sections revealed that the treatment modality did not alter the histologic findings. The corneal changes noted in all groups were vacuolization of the basal epithelial layer, anterior stromal necrosis with loss of keratocytes and moderate to severe inflammatory reaction.-Corneal tissue (one pair from each group) was submitted for RT-PCR for assay of growth factors and inflammatory markers. Honey decreased the expression of VEGF, B-FGF, TNF and IL-12 compared to erythromycin and to no treatment. The results were epuivocal for IFN.

Conclusions: : Honey can improve corneal epithelial healing. The clinical significance of the effect of honey on the growth factors and on the inflammatory markers needs further investigation.

Keywords: cornea: epithelium • wound healing • growth factors/growth factor receptors 
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