May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Intravitreal Injection of Bevacizumab in Subfoveal Choroidal Neovascularization Due to Pathological Myopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Rosina
    University of Milan, Milano, Italy
    Ophthalmology/H. SACCO,
  • L. Bertazzi
    University of Milan, Milano, Italy
    Ophthalmology/H. SACCO,
  • F. Bottoni
    University of Milan, Milano, Italy
    Ophthalmology/H. SACCO,
  • G. Levi
    University of Milan, Milano, Italy
    Ophthalmology/H. SACCO,
  • M. Cigada
    University of Milan, Milano, Italy
    Ophthalmology/Policlinico,
  • G. Staurenghi
    University of Milan, Milano, Italy
    Ophthalmology/H. SACCO,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C. Rosina, None; L. Bertazzi, None; F. Bottoni, None; G. Levi, None; M. Cigada, None; G. Staurenghi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3456. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      C. Rosina, L. Bertazzi, F. Bottoni, G. Levi, M. Cigada, G. Staurenghi; Intravitreal Injection of Bevacizumab in Subfoveal Choroidal Neovascularization Due to Pathological Myopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3456. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal bevacizumab in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), in patients with pathological myopia, unresponsive to photodynamic therapy (PDT).

Methods: : Retrospective chart review of 20 consecutive patients treated with intravitreal (IVT) bevacizumab (1.25 mg) for subfoveal choroidal neovascularization due to pathological myopia between February 2006 and October 2007. All patients were previously treated with PDT. Recurrence of CNV was confirmed by fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Outcome measures included visual acuity (VA), retinal thickness with OCT, and degree of leakage on fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography.

Results: : Twenty eyes of twenty patients were included. The mean age was 54.9 years (range 32-78). All patients were previously treated with PDT. The baseline mean VA was 2.6/10, the final VA was 3.9/10 with a mean follow up of 15.18 months (range 10-19). Overall, in 15 out of 20 (75%) eyes the CNV was successfully closed at last follow up visit. Seven of 20 eyes (35%) received 1 bevacizumab IVT, seven (35%) 2 injection, five (25%) 4 injection and 1 eye (5%) received 5 IVT. All eyes (14), that received 1 or 2 treatments, had angiographic closure of lesion and 1 eye undergoing 4 bevacizumab injections had the same result.There were no systemic or ocular complications.

Conclusions: : In this small series of CNV due to pathological myopia intravitreal bevacizumab showed a good efficacy and safety. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate a larger number of patient and a long-term follow up.

Keywords: choroid: neovascularization • myopia • injection 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×