May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
A Novel Non-Invasive Training Method Induces Pupil Constriction During Far Accommodation to Improve Visual Acuity in Myopic School-Aged Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H. Horie
    Reseach center of Brain and Oral Science, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka, Japan
    TechnoMaster Co. Ltd., Yokohama, Japan
  • K. Yuda
    Kikuna Yuda Eye Clinic, Yokohama, Japan
  • E. Ookawa
    Panasonic Shikoku Electronics Co., Ltd., Yokohama, Japan
  • S. Hisahara
    Panasonic Shikoku Electronics Co., Ltd., Yokohama, Japan
  • H. Uozato
    Dept of Ophthalmol & Visual Sci, Kitasato Univ, Kanagawa, Japan
  • H. Horie
    TechnoMaster Co. Ltd., Yokohama, Japan
  • S. Nakajima
    TechnoMaster Co. Ltd., Yokohama, Japan
  • N. Hara
    Dept. of Ophthalmol., Yokohama Dental and Medical Clinic, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokohama, Japan
  • K. Kamigaki
    Dept. of Ophthalmol., Yokohama Dental and Medical Clinic, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokohama, Japan
  • W. Tetzlaff
    ICORD, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  H. Horie, None; K. Yuda, None; E. Ookawa, None; S. Hisahara, None; H. Uozato, None; H. Horie, None; S. Nakajima, None; N. Hara, None; K. Kamigaki, None; W. Tetzlaff, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3584. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      H. Horie, K. Yuda, E. Ookawa, S. Hisahara, H. Uozato, H. Horie, S. Nakajima, N. Hara, K. Kamigaki, W. Tetzlaff; A Novel Non-Invasive Training Method Induces Pupil Constriction During Far Accommodation to Improve Visual Acuity in Myopic School-Aged Children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3584.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Myopia in school-aged children has become highly prevalent in modernized countries, especially in Asia. Despite the development of treatments, such as progressive addition lenses or photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), myopia in schoolchildren is progressive and an optimal treatment is yet to be found. We describe a novel, safe and non-invasive training method to effectively improve visual acuity.

Methods: : We developed a novel device to stimulate quick cycles of near/far accommodation by displaying a visual object (a white circle on a black background) on a LCD screen and moving the screen in cycles from a near (25cm) to a far (70 cm) point and back, while keeping the retinal projection size and brightness of the object constant. Forty-five myopic school-aged children were treated for short 3 minute sessions up to 3 times a week over a period of 12-106 weeks.

Results: : The object was moved at a velocity of maximally 100 cm/sec into the far position and maximally 50 cm/sec into the near position. The training with this condition induced a pupillary constriction upon far accommodation, not seen in normal subjects nor in untrained myopic children. This pupillary constriction could not be produced by the fixed-size object. The pupillary constriction leads to an increased depth of focus of the eye and a decreased spherical aberration to improve visual acuity. 81% (73/90) of the myopic children experienced improved visual acuity by more than 0.1 logMAR (minimum angle of resolution) units with an average improvement of (0.29±;0.03) logMAR units. There were no cases of adverse effects and the benefit was maintained for the duration of this training, which we confirmed for up to one year.

Conclusions: : This simple, short, comfortable and safe accommodation training induced a pupillary constriction during far accommodation in myopic school-aged children resulting with great improvement of the quality of vision

Keywords: myopia • pupil • visual acuity 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×