May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Comparison Between Obtained Mydriasis in Type 2 Diabetics and Non-Diabetic Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. M. Motta
    Ophthalmology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Ophthalmology, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • J. Coblentz
    Ophthalmology, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • B. Fernandes
    Ophthalmology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • M. Burnier, Jr.
    Ophthalmology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.M. Motta, None; J. Coblentz, None; B. Fernandes, None; M. Burnier, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3615. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      M. M. Motta, J. Coblentz, B. Fernandes, M. Burnier, Jr.; Comparison Between Obtained Mydriasis in Type 2 Diabetics and Non-Diabetic Patients. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3615. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Evaluate and compare obtained mydriasis with Phenylephrine 10% associated with Tropicamide 1%, in type 2 diabetics and non-diabetics.

Methods: : A total of 50 patients scheduled for fundus examination were dilated with Phenylephrine 10% associated with Tropicamide 1%. Group 0 consisted in 20 type 2 diabetic patients and group 1 consisted in 30 non-diabetic patients. Drugs were applied with a 5 minutes interval and a drop of proximetacain 0,5% was instilled in each eye 1 minute before initiating mydriatic drugs.Patients were instructed to close eyelids after instillation and to keep eyes closed for at least 30 seconds. In both groups, pupil diameter was measured 60 minutes after eyedrops instilation. Patients aged 18 years or older were included in our study. Exclusion criteria were chronic use of topic pilocarpine, pseudophakic eyes, presence of synechiae, previous intraocular eye surgery and rubeosis. For statistical analysis we used the Mann-Whitney test, assuming values of p<0.05 as statistically significant.

Results: : Both groups were similar regarding age (p=0.06). Mean pupil diameter in group 0 was 8.57 and 8.73 in group 1. There was no statistic difference between both groups (p=0.44). Pupil diameter was greater than 7 mm in all patients (100%).

Conclusions: : Although there are few studies regarding this issue, there is a belief that mydriasis is poorer in diabetics when compared to non-diabetic patients 1,2. In diabetic patients, we find edema and vesiculation of the pigmented epithelium of iris and ciliary body, and glicogenous degeneration of the tissues that affects iris stroma and sphincter and dilator muscles. However, these are not proved to cause mydriasis differences2. Also, pupil in diabetics is less reactive, especially to mydriatics, probably due to neuropathy that affects autonomic nervous system3. Optimal mydriasis is necessary to allow adequate fundus examination, with at least 6.0 mm pupil diameter. To achieve this goal, a combination of tropicamide and phenylephrine is frequently used4,5. Preinstillation of topical anesthetics6 eliminated the difference in absorption of drugs due to burning or discomfort. In our study, all patients had pupil diameter greater than 7.0 mm, and there was no statistically significant difference in the amount of pupillary dilation between both groups. So, when appropriate drug combination is used7,8, diabetics can achieve mydriasis as satisfactory as non-diabetic patients, allowing adequate fundus examination and/or retinopathy treatment.

Keywords: diabetes • pupil • drug toxicity/drug effects 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×