May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Subconjunctival Ranibizumab and Bevacizumab Inhibit Corneal Neovascularization in an Animal Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • V. S. Liarakos
    Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece
  • M. Papathanassiou
    Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece
  • P. Theodossiadis
    Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece
  • A. Rouvas
    Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece
  • M. Douvali
    Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece
  • E. Papastergiopoulou
    Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece
  • I. A. Vergados
    Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  V.S. Liarakos, None; M. Papathanassiou, None; P. Theodossiadis, None; A. Rouvas, None; M. Douvali, None; E. Papastergiopoulou, None; I.A. Vergados, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3743. doi:
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      V. S. Liarakos, M. Papathanassiou, P. Theodossiadis, A. Rouvas, M. Douvali, E. Papastergiopoulou, I. A. Vergados; Subconjunctival Ranibizumab and Bevacizumab Inhibit Corneal Neovascularization in an Animal Model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3743.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate the effect of two anti-VEGF agents, Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab, on experimentally induced corneal neovascularization (corneal NV).

Methods: : Eighteen N.Zealand white rabbits were randomly and equally divided in 6 groups. A model of corneal NV secondary to alkali burn was applied to groups 1-4. A single injection was administered subconjunctivally 2mm from the limbus as follows: 3.75mg of Bevacizumab on day 1 (group 1) or day 14 (group 2); 0.5mg of Ranibizumab on day 1 (group 3); a sham injection of 0.15cc BSS on day 1 (group 4). Groups 5 and 6 were left uncauterized but were treated with 3.75mg of Bevacizumab and 0.5mg of Ranibizumab respectively. Follow-up ended in 28 days. Every procedure was conducted in compliance with the ARVO statement for the use of animals in ophthalmic and vision research.

Results: : Corneal NV in groups 1-4 on day 28 was 4.7±3.1%, 13.3±2.3%, 7.3±6.7% and 34.7±9.3% of the corneal surface respectively. Corneal NV was found to be significantly restricted in the treated groups compared to the untreated, both on day 7 as well as day 28 (p<0.05; one-way ANOVA). Bevacizumab treatment on day 1 showed best results. Early administration of Bevacizumab proved to be more effective than late treatment in the first as well as fourth week (p=0.037 and p=0.046 respectively; Mann-Whitney U test). Bevacizumab provided slightly better results compared to Ranibizumab; difference was statistically significant in the first but not in the fourth week (p=0.037 and p=0.658 respectively; Mann-Whitney U test). Induced corneal scarring remained relatively stable during the 4 weeks (39.6±3.5%), with no significant difference between cauterized groups (p>0.05; one-way ANOVA). No side-effects were recorded.

Conclusions: : Early subconjunctival administration of the anti-VEGF agents Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab could successfully inhibit corneal neovascularization, without any side effects. Treatment did not affect the course of corneal scarring.

Keywords: neovascularization • vascular endothelial growth factor • cornea: clinical science 
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