May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Therapeutic Effect of Subconjunctival and Intraocular Bevacizumab (Avastin) Injections in a Mouse Model of Corneal Neovascularization
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • I. Avisar
    Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • O. Dratviman
    Krieger Eye Research Laboratory, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Tel Aviv University, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
  • I. Kremer
    Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • D. Weinberger
    Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • N. Goldenberg-Cohen
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
    Krieger Eye Research Laboratory, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Tel Aviv University, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  I. Avisar, None; O. Dratviman, None; I. Kremer, None; D. Weinberger, None; N. Goldenberg-Cohen, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Rabin Medical canter grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3745. doi:
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      I. Avisar, O. Dratviman, I. Kremer, D. Weinberger, N. Goldenberg-Cohen; Therapeutic Effect of Subconjunctival and Intraocular Bevacizumab (Avastin) Injections in a Mouse Model of Corneal Neovascularization. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3745.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine the efficacy of bevacizumab in the treatment of corneal neovascularizaiton in a rodent model, using different methods of injection.

Methods: : Corneal neovascularization was induced by chemical irritation in 50 eyes of 50 untreated mice (model) and in 75 eyes of 75 mice treated with bevacizumab, administered by subconjunctival injection, anterior chamber injection, or intravitreal injection immediately after corneal damage. Digital photos were taken, and the findings were computer-analyzed on days 2, 4, 8, and 10 after induction of neovascularization. Corneas were dissected and immunostained with CD31 antibody for endothelial cells. VEGF mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

Results: : Maximal growth of new vessels was detected on day 10. The rate of neovascularization in the untreated eyes progressed from 11% (±7%) on day 2 to 20%(±8.9), 47%(±25.4), and 51%(±24.7) on days 4, 8, and 10, respectively. Significantely less neovascularization was detected in the bevacizumab-treated eyes at each time point: 11% (±1.6) on day 2, 15% (±4.4), 25% (±3.3), and 28% (±8.8) on day 4,8 and 10 (p<0.05 for all). Injections via the intra- and periocular route were equally effective. The maximal effect was noted on day 2 in the mice treated subconjunctivally and on day 8 in the mice treated by direct injection into the eye. PCR studies of VEGF levels and CD31 staining were comparable with the presented data.

Conclusions: : Bevacizumab injections partially inhibit the progressive corneal neovascularization induced by chemical damage in a mouse cornea. Subconjunctival injection yields an earlier peak response than intraocular injection.

Keywords: cornea: basic science • neovascularization • growth factors/growth factor receptors 
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