May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Bright Flash Rod Response Adds Information on Rod System Function in 25% of Recorded Eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Nilsson
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Goteborg University, Goteborg, Sweden
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • T. Wright
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • C. A. Westall
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J. Nilsson, None; T. Wright, None; C.A. Westall, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3812. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      J. Nilsson, T. Wright, C. A. Westall; Bright Flash Rod Response Adds Information on Rod System Function in 25% of Recorded Eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3812. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : The scotopic b-wave response, commonly called the rod ERG, is the standard measure of rod function in clinical ERG testing. The scotopic b-wave response may not be the optimum measure of rod activity. Analysis of high intensity flash a-waves (bright flash ERG) is an additional method of assessing the rod system. This study compares information obtained with rod ERG with that obtained by bright flash ERG.

Methods: : The bright flash ERG protocol was added to all clinical ERG protocols in our lab. A total of 2396 eyes were recorded. Patient age ranged from 2.4 months to 84.6 years.

Results: : Bright flash ERG provided additional information on rod system function above that obtained with rod ERG in 25% of eyes recorded, most importantly in subjects with midretinal disease and artificially reduced rod responses. Bright flash ERG also provided a measurable response for longitudinal monitoring in rod dystophies with non-recordable rod ERGs. Results from patients with normal standard ERG results provided information on development of the rod photoreceptor response; bright flash response matures at 3-4 years of age and remains stable throughout adult life.

Conclusions: : The bright flash protocol is a valuable tool for assessing rod system function in a wide set of retinal diseases and testing situations. Clinical ERG testing would benefit greatly from adding the bright flash protocol to its standard testing conditions.

Keywords: electrophysiology: clinical • retinal development • photoreceptors 
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