May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Corneal Epithelial Abrasion and Wound Healing in the Mouse: Kinetics of Keratocyte and Stromal Recovery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. Gagen
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    Pediatrics,
    University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas
  • S. Dieffenbaugher
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    Pediatrics,
  • E. Brown
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    Medicine,
  • Z. Li
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    Pediatrics,
    Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
  • C. W. Smith
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    Pediatrics,
  • M. Petrescu
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    Pediatrics,
  • A. R. Burns
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    Pediatrics,
    Medicine,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D. Gagen, None; S. Dieffenbaugher, None; E. Brown, None; Z. Li, None; C.W. Smith, None; M. Petrescu, None; A.R. Burns, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grants EY-017120 and HL-070537
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 3931. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      D. Gagen, S. Dieffenbaugher, E. Brown, Z. Li, C. W. Smith, M. Petrescu, A. R. Burns; Corneal Epithelial Abrasion and Wound Healing in the Mouse: Kinetics of Keratocyte and Stromal Recovery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):3931. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Corneal epithelial abrasions are among the most common patient complaints presented to ophthalmologists. Because epithelial lesions typically heal in 2-3 days, little attention has been focused on sub-epithelial sequelae. This is surprising since studies in animals reveal epithelial abrasion is accompanied by keratocyte death and stromal edema. Because detailed information on keratocyte and stromal recovery after epithelial abrasion is lacking, we undertook a study to 1) evaluate keratocyte densities and distributions within the normal mouse stroma and 2) assess the kinetics of keratocyte and stromal recovery following a central non-penetrating corneal epithelial abrasion.

Methods: : 2 mm central epithelial abrasion without damage to the basal lamina was performed on right corneas of C57Bl/6 mice. Corneas were excised at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, 14 and 28 days post-injury. Whole mount corneas were stained with a FITC-conjugated leukocyte antibody cocktail plus 100 ug/ml DAPI. The entire whole mount thickness was imaged and keratocyte counts (DAPI positive, FITC negative) were made at central, paracentral, and paralimbal regions using a DeltaVision Spectris inverted microscope.

Results: : In the uninjured cornea, more keratocytes (~55%) were distributed in the anterior half of the stroma, across all regions of the cornea. Six hours after epithelial abrasion, there was a 20% increase in stromal thickness due to edema (p<0.05). By 24 hours, the abrasion was covered by a thin layer of epithelial cells. However, as expected, few keratocytes were visible in the anterior half of the central stroma. Full epithelial thickness was restored by 4 days, and central anterior keratocyte density began to recover. As well, keratocyte density in the posterior half increased above baseline by 60% (p<0.05). Stromal edema was no longer evident, and the central corneal stroma had collapsed to 80% of baseline thickness (p<0.05). While corneal stromal thickness rebounded to baseline by 14 days, central anterior keratocytes only recovered to 80% of baseline values (p<0.05) and anterior keratocyte density did not increase further by 4 weeks.

Conclusions: : The data show epithelial abrasion induces long lasting and profound changes in stromal organization. While keratocyte recovery in the central anterior stroma is initially rapid, it is also incomplete, and plateaus at 2-4 weeks. Longer studies will be needed to determine if complete keratocyte recovery is possible.

Keywords: cornea: stroma and keratocytes • inflammation • wound healing 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×