May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Prevalence and Causes of Low Vision and Blindness in an Isolated Southern Island of Japan: The Kumejima Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. Sawaguchi
    Ophthalmology, Ryukyu Univ School of Medicine, Nishihara-Cho, Japan
  • Y. Nakamura
    Ophthalmology, Ryukyu Univ School of Medicine, Nishihara-Cho, Japan
  • H. Sakai
    Ophthalmology, Ryukyu Univ School of Medicine, Nishihara-Cho, Japan
  • A. Iwase
    Ophthalmology, Tajimi Municipal Hospital, Tajimi, Japan
  • A. Tomidokoro
    Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • M. Araie
    Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S. Sawaguchi, None; Y. Nakamura, None; H. Sakai, None; A. Iwase, None; A. Tomidokoro, None; M. Araie, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 4117. doi:
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      S. Sawaguchi, Y. Nakamura, H. Sakai, A. Iwase, A. Tomidokoro, M. Araie; Prevalence and Causes of Low Vision and Blindness in an Isolated Southern Island of Japan: The Kumejima Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):4117.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine the prevalence and causes of low vision (LV) and blindness (BLD) in the adult population of an isolated southern island of Japan.

Methods: : A population-based ophthalmological survey was conducted from March 2005 to August 2006 in Kumejima Island, located at 26° N, 126°'E in the East China Sea. Of all 4632 residents with age of 40 yrs or older, 3762 (response rate, 81.2%) underwent screening examination including measurement of the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) with a Landolt ring chart at 5 m. LV and BLD were defined as BCVA in the better eye worse than 20/60 to a lower limit of 20/400 and worse than 20/400, respectively (World Health Organization [WHO] criteria) and worse than 20/40 but better than 20/200 and 20/200 or worse, respectively (United States [US] criteria).

Results: : The overall prevalence of LV according to the WHO and US criteria was 1.09% and 1.67%, respectively, with leading causes of cataract (0.33%), retinitis pigmentosa (0.17%), diabetic retinopathy (0.11%). The overall prevalence of BLD according to the WHO and US criteria was 0.39% and 0.75%, respectively. The primary causes were retinitis pigmentosa (0.17%) and glaucoma (0.11%). Those of monocular LV were cataract (1.10%), corneal opacity (0.19%), and retinitis pigmentosa (0.17%), while those of monocular BLD were cataract (0.29%), trauma (0.23%), and glaucoma (0.22%).

Conclusions: : The prevalence of LV and BLD in adult residents in a southern island of Japan was 1.5 to 3 times higher than those in Tajimi City, an urban city in Japanese Main Land (Iwase et al. Ophthalmology

Clinical Trial: : www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm sshoichi@u-ryukyu.ac.jp

Keywords: low vision • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower • visual acuity 
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