May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Peripheral Fundus Photography in Children During Examination Under Anesthesia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H. Sakamoto
    Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    Ophthalmology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • C. Westerfeld
    Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • S. Mukai
    Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  H. Sakamoto, None; C. Westerfeld, None; S. Mukai, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 4223. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      H. Sakamoto, C. Westerfeld, S. Mukai; Peripheral Fundus Photography in Children During Examination Under Anesthesia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):4223. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Photography of retinal pathology is important in its management. Peripheral retinal photography in pediatric patients is difficult even during an examination under anesthesia (EUA), and traditionally, detailed fundus drawings were used. We have evaluated three techniques for peripheral retinal photography with scleral depression (SD) during EUAs in children.

Methods: : All photographs were taken with dilated pupils and during EUA. The three systems were: 1. still-image capture with an operating microscope video system with a 60D lens, 2. Kowa RC-2® camera with a 28D lens, and 3. RetCam II® with the 130° (ROP) lens. The systems were evaluated for image quality, field of view, ease of use, and cost.

Results: : Peripheral retinal photography out to beyond the ora serrata was possible with each system. System 1 was most readily available in an eye operating room (OR) and relatively easy to master, but gave the poorest images even when still images were captured on a high-resolution video system. The field of view was in the midrange, and ease of dynamic documentation with video was useful. Cost was low with access to a fully equipped OR, but the system was not portable. System 2 gave the highest resolution images but the film format was inconvenient and did not give prompt feedback (a new digital system, Kowa Genesis-D®, is available that was not tested). The field of view was moderate. This was the most difficult technique. The cost of the system was moderate and portability was excellent. System 3 gave very good images in digital format and was relatively easy to use. The cost was extremely high, and it was cumbersome to transport.

Conclusions: : Each technique allowed consistent photodocumentation of the peripheral retina even out beyond the ora serrata. The advantages and disadvantages of each system are discussed.

Keywords: imaging/image analysis: clinical • retinopathy of prematurity • retinoblastoma 
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