May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Phytochemicals Reduce NF-B Phosphorylation at 24 Hr But Not at 1 Hr Following Light Exposure in RPE Cells
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. T. Lee
    Ophthalmology, Univ Texas HSC San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
  • N. R. Prabhu
    Ophthalmology, Univ Texas HSC San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
  • N. Kumar
    Ophthalmology, Univ Texas HSC San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
  • S. B. H. Bach
    Chemistry, Univ Texas San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
  • C. Mullens
    Chemistry, Univ Texas San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
  • R. D. Glickman
    Ophthalmology, Univ Texas HSC San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S.T. Lee, None; N.R. Prabhu, None; N. Kumar, None; S.B.H. Bach, None; C. Mullens, None; R.D. Glickman, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Univ of Texas System/SALSI Grant and Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 4390. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      S. T. Lee, N. R. Prabhu, N. Kumar, S. B. H. Bach, C. Mullens, R. D. Glickman; Phytochemicals Reduce NF-B Phosphorylation at 24 Hr But Not at 1 Hr Following Light Exposure in RPE Cells. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):4390.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Certain phytochemicals, such as the stilbene, resveratrol (Rsvt, found in red grapes and berries), and the triterpenoid, ursolic acid (UA, found in various berries and medicinal plants), have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor effects. Here we report the effects of these two compounds on pro-inflammatory responses in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, following light exposure that has previously been demonstrated to cause NF-ΚB nuclear translocation in these cells (Glickman et al., Proc. SPIE 5695:260, 2005).

Methods: : Experiments were conducted with the hTERT-RPE cell line. In one series of experiments, cells were loaded with 10 µM dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH) to detect presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the second series, cells were incubated for one hour prior to light exposure in phenol-free medium alone, or in medium supplemented with 2 µM Rsvt (MP Bio) or UA (Sigma). The cells were then exposed for 7.5 min to the broadband output of a 150 W Hg vapor arc lamp, at an irradiance of 18 mW/cm2. Following post-exposure incubation of 1 hr or 24 hr, cells were harvested, and the presence of phosphorylated NF-ΚB (p65 component) was assayed by ELISA (Cell Signaling Tech.) according to the manufacturer’s protocol.

Results: : Similar to our previous findings, in untreated cells, light exposure produced a biphasic increase in NF-ΚB activation, i.e. at 1 hr and 24 hr. In cells treated with Rsvt or UA, the phospho-NF-ΚB levels were comparable to untreated cells at 1 hr post-exposure; however, by 24 hr post-exposure, NF-ΚB levels were lower than in the untreated cells. The DCFH assay indicated elevated levels of ROS in Rsvt-treated cells at 1 hr post-exposure.

Conclusions: : The early increase in ROS in the presence of Rsvt during light exposure indicates a possible photochemical interaction, possibly due to the known photoisomerization of cis to trans-Rsvt. In contrast, by 24 hr post -exposure, Rsvt or UA treatment appears to exert a possible anti-inflammatory effect by lowering NF-kB activation.

Keywords: neuroprotection • oxidation/oxidative or free radical damage • radiation damage: light/UV 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×