May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Correlation Between Vertical Kinetic Visual Acuity and Visual Evoked Potential
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Mizota
    Ophthalmology, Juntendo Univ Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu, Japan
  • M. Tanaka
    Ophthalmology, Juntendo Univ Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu, Japan
  • H. Yoshigi
    Sports Science, Juntendo University, Shisui, Japan
  • Y. Kohmura
    Sports Science, Juntendo University, Shisui, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Mizota, None; M. Tanaka, None; H. Yoshigi, None; Y. Kohmura, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 4458. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      A. Mizota, M. Tanaka, H. Yoshigi, Y. Kohmura; Correlation Between Vertical Kinetic Visual Acuity and Visual Evoked Potential. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):4458. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine whether a significant correlation exists between the vertical kinetic visual acuity (VKVA) and the peak latency of the pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs).

Methods: : Fourteen normal male volunteers (age: 19-25 year-old) with corrected visual acuity ≥20/20 were studied. The static visual acuity (SVA), VKVA, and pattern reversal VEPs were recorded. The SVA and VKVA were measured with a kinetic visual acuity meter (AS-4F, KOWA, Tokyo Jpn). VEPs were amplified (Biopac ERS 100, Monte System, Tokyo, Jpn), and the responses were signal averaged (Biopac MP150, Monte System, Tokyo, Jpn). Black and white checkerboard pattern with check size of 60 minutes and 2 reversals/second were used. The stimulus field size was 20x30°, the mean luminance was 79 cd/m2, and the contrast was 86%. The peak latency of the N75, P100, and N135 component was measured. The correlations between each peak latency and logMAR visual acuity of SVA and VKVA were analyzed.

Results: : There were no significant correlations between peak latencies of N75, P100, or N135 and SVA. For VKVA, the peak latency of N75 decreased with an increase of VKVA, and this correlation was statistically significant. Other components of the VEP did not show significant correlations with the VKVA.

Conclusions: : These finding suggested that initial response of the primary visual cortex are correlated with the VKVA.

Keywords: visual acuity • vision and action • visual cortex 
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