May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Quality of Life of Uveal Melanoma Survivors
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. Frenkel
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel
    Ophthalmology,
  • H. Rosenne
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel
    Social Work,
  • K. Hendler
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel
    Ophthalmology,
  • R. Baruch
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel
    Ophthalmology,
  • J. Pe’er
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel
    Ophthalmology,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S. Frenkel, None; H. Rosenne, None; K. Hendler, None; R. Baruch, None; J. Pe’er, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Supported by grant 20070025 C from the Israel Cancer Association
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 4480. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      S. Frenkel, H. Rosenne, K. Hendler, R. Baruch, J. Pe’er; Quality of Life of Uveal Melanoma Survivors. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):4480. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Uveal melanoma (UM) patients need life-long follow-up since metastases can occur even more than 15 years after diagnosis. Little is known about the quality of life (QOL) of UM survivors for such a long period. The purpose of this study is to describe the QOL of UM survivors as a factor of age, diagnosis, time since diagnosis, primary treatment, overall best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and BCVA in the melanoma eye.

Methods: : A cohort of 294 patients who were treated for UM was asked to fill a questionnaire comprised of the EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-OPT30 modules. The questionnaire was completed during a regular clinic visit. Answers ranged from 1 (completely unaffected) to 4 (severely affected). An open question requested a description of other changes in the patient's life since diagnosis. Independent demographic and medical variables were collected from medical records.

Results: : From January through August 2007, 232 of 294 patients agreed to complete the questionnaire. The mean score for general QOL and eye-related QOL were high: 1.5 ± 0.52 and 1.67 ± 0.52 (mean ± SD) respectively. General QOL was highly correlated to eye-related QOL (F=207.26, p<0.0001) in an almost 1:1 relationship. Older age, a tumor not involving the ciliary body, and better BCVA were associated with statistically significant higher QOL. A subgroup of 39% of the patients reported severely affected eye-related tasks. Thirty-three percent were highly concerned about different aspects of their future health (e.g. recurrence or metastases). Patients after local resection or enucleation reported slightly higher eye-related QOL, although in response to the open question described problems related to body image.

Conclusions: : General QOL of UM patients is slightly affected by their malignancy. As eye-related QOL decreases, so does general QOL. Body image and psycho-social adjustment should be considered in evaluating QOL. The subgroup of patients who do suffer from their eyes is in need of psycho-social intervention not only after diagnosis but also on a continuing basis. All patients need information about physical and psycho-social implications of treatment in the short and long term.

Keywords: oncology • quality of life • tumors 
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