May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
In vivo Time-Lapse Fluorescence Imaging of Individual Retinal Ganglion Cells in Mice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. K. Walsh
    Ophthalmology, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • H. A. Quigley
    Ophthalmology, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.K. Walsh, None; H.A. Quigley, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Harry A. Quigley Research Award from the Wilmer Eye Institute (MKW); NIH grants EY 02120 and 01765 (HAQ); Unrestricted support from the Leonard Wagner Trust, New York, NY (HAQ).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 4513. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      M. K. Walsh, H. A. Quigley; In vivo Time-Lapse Fluorescence Imaging of Individual Retinal Ganglion Cells in Mice. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):4513. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To develop a technique to produce time-lapse images of individualretinal ganglion cells (RGCs), their dendrites and axons invivo.

 
Methods:
 

A standard confocal laser scanning microscope, transgenic micethat express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in a subset ofRGCs, and survival anesthesia techniques were utilized.

 
Results:
 

The same individual RGCs with their dendritic arbors and axonswere multiply imaged on separate days in vivo in both adult(Figure 1 and Figure 3 left and middle panels) and juvenilemice. Additionally, the same RGC that was imaged in vivo couldthen be located and imaged in fixed retinal whole mount preparations(Figures 2 and 3; right panels show fixed tissue, left panelsare images taken in vivo).

 
Conclusions:
 

We have developed a technique that permits time-lapse imagingof RGCs and their cellular processes in mammals in vivo forthe first time. This novel technique has many potential applications.  

  

 
Keywords: retina: proximal (bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells) 
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