May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
The Effects of Crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid on pHEMA and pHEMA/TRIS Hydrogel Contact Lens Materials
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. K. Weeks
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    School of Biomedical Engineering,
  • H. Sheardown
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    School of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering,
    School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • L. Jones
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    School of Biomedical Engineering,
    School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A.K. Weeks, None; H. Sheardown, None; L. Jones, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NSERC
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 4866. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      A. K. Weeks, H. Sheardown, L. Jones; The Effects of Crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid on pHEMA and pHEMA/TRIS Hydrogel Contact Lens Materials. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):4866. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate the effects of the addition of crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) on model contact lens materials.

Methods: : pHEMA and pHEMA/TRIS (silicone) hydrogels were synthesized using a UV chamber. HA of varying molecular weights was loaded into these materials and then crosslinked using EDC. Advancing water contact angle analysis and XPS analysis were performed on pHEMA and pHEMA/TRIS hydrogels (n ≥ 3). Equilibrium water content was determined for pHEMA/TRIS hydrogels (n=3). In vitro lysozyme activity and total lysozyme adsorption assays were also performed.

Results: : The mean advancing water contact (AWC) angles (in o) for pHEMA hydrogels were 72.8 ± 3.1, 55.9 ± 6.6, 55.8 ± 5.0 and 47.9 ± 4.4 for control, 6.3 kDa HA, 35 kDa HA and 169 kDa HA, respectively. Mean AWC angles for 90% pHEMA 10% TRIS hydrogels were 85.8 ± 5.0, 69.1 ± 3.2, 65.2 ± 4.0 and 64.5 ± 2.5 degrees for control, 6.3 kDa HA, 35 kDa HA and 169 kDa HA, respectively. In all cases, the addition of crosslinked HA to these materials resulted in a significant reduction in contact angles (p<0.01). XPS revealed changes in the surface for pHEMA, 90% pHEMA 10% TRIS and 95% pHEMA 5% TRIS hydrogels with the addition of 35 and 169 kDa HA. The mean equilibrium water content (EWC) of 95% pHEMA 10% TRIS hydrogels at 24 hrs was 34.9 ± 0.3, 40.8 ± 0.2, 47.6 ± 0.2 and 37.2 ± 1.6 percent for control, 6.3 kDa HA, 35 kDa HA and 169 kDa, respectively. The addition of 6.3 and 35 kDa HA significantly increased the EWC of all materials (p<.0001). HA significantly reduced lysozyme adsorption of pHEMA hydrogels (p<.0001). The mean percentage of active lysozyme adsorbed on pHEMA hydrogels was 29.4 ± 10.8, 38.9 ± 9.5, 48.5 ± 30.3 and 57.9 ± 16.2 for control, 4.7 kDa HA, 35 kDa HA and 169 kDa HA, respectively. The addition of crosslinked HA significantly increased the percentage of active lysozyme (p<0.05).

Conclusions: : Crosslinked HA increased the hydrophilicity of pHEMA and pHEMA/TRIS hydrogel materials, reduced lysozyme deposition and reduced the degree of lysozyme denaturation.

Keywords: contact lens • cornea: tears/tear film/dry eye 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×