May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Anatomical and Visual Prognosis of Open and Closed Globe Injury Retinal Detachment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Chiquet
    Department of Ophthalmology, Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble, France
  • J.-P. Romanet
    Department of Ophthalmology, Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble, France
  • P. Denis
    Department of Ophthalmology, E. Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France
  • F. Rouberol
    Department of Ophthalmology, E. Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C. Chiquet, None; J. Romanet, None; P. Denis, None; F. Rouberol, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 5234. doi:https://doi.org/
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      C. Chiquet, J.-P. Romanet, P. Denis, F. Rouberol; Anatomical and Visual Prognosis of Open and Closed Globe Injury Retinal Detachment. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):5234. doi: https://doi.org/.

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Abstract

Purpose: : to compare initial clinical features and final prognosis of retinal detachments (RD) secondary to open or closed ocular trauma

Methods: : 50 patients with trauma RD were consecutively included in a prospective study during a 3-year period. All patients had a follow-up greater than 6 months. The most common surgical procedure included pars plana vitrectomy, scleral buckling, cryotherapy and gas tamponnade. Statistical analysis (SPSS 12.0 software) was performed to compare both groups of RD (following open / closed globe injury).

Results: : Epidemiological data showed a large predominance of male (82%), an initial open globe injury (50%) with or without intraocular foreign body (IOFB), or an initial closed globe injury (50%). Clinical features were similar between both groups for: localization and extent of RD, number and nature of tears, the presence and extent of proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Most of these RD occurred within a delay less than 1 month. Three-port pars plana vitrectomy, with or without scleral buckling, was performed in 95% and 60% of the cases in the groups of open and closed globe injury, respectively. Final anatomical and visual prognosis was similar in both groups. 25% of patients had a recurrence of RD in both groups. Three final anatomical failures were related to an history of posttraumatic endophthalmitis and a posterior IOFB of 4mm length and a proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

Conclusions: : The final prognosis were similar in eyes with initial contusion as compared in eyes with penetrating trauma. The surgical procedure of these RDs often includes pars plana vitrectomy with gas exchange. Use of silicone is not often required.

Keywords: retinal detachment • trauma • proliferative vitreoretinopathy 
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