May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Etiology of Infectious Corneal Ulcers and Bacterial Susceptibility to Antibiotics at the University of Chicago
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. B. Patel
    Ophthalmology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • K. B. Patel
    Ophthalmology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • M. A. Saidel
    Ophthalmology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S.B. Patel, None; K.B. Patel, None; M.A. Saidel, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 5526. doi:https://doi.org/
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      S. B. Patel, K. B. Patel, M. A. Saidel; Etiology of Infectious Corneal Ulcers and Bacterial Susceptibility to Antibiotics at the University of Chicago. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):5526. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : We analyzed the laboratory results of corneal ulcers seen at University of Chicago between 2002 and 2007 in order to determine the relative frequencies of pathogens causing bacterial ulcers and the susceptibility of the causal bacteria. The results were then compared to a previous study at a different institution from 1976-1999 in order to observe changes in bacterial trends and geographic variations.

Methods: : A retrospective chart review was done for all patients identified as having a corneal ulcer between the years 2002 and 2007. Only patients with central corneal ulcers were included in the study. Patients with viral, fungal, protozoan or neurotrophic ulcers were excluded (eg. bacterial ulcers only). The culture results of the central ulcers and the bacterial susceptibility to different antibiotics were analyzed.

Results: : 62 central corneal ulcers were identified. 53 of these ulcers were cultured (85%). 34 of the cultured ulcers had positive cultures (64%). Many of the ulcers were polymicrobial, with a total of 52 organisms isolated from the 34 cultures. Further analysis was done to determine the correlation of ulcers with contact lens wear. 29 patients were contact lens wearers (47%).The most common organisms isolated were Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase negative staphylococcus, E. coli, and Serratia marcescens. The antibiotic susceptibilities for these most prevalent bacteria are shown in the table below.

Keywords: keratitis • antibiotics/antifungals/antiparasitics • cornea: clinical science 
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