May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Microbiological and Clinical Profile of Cases of Microbial Keratitis Residing in Aged Care Facility
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • V. Jhanji
    Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne, Australia
  • M. Constantinou
    Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne, Australia
  • S. Ghosh
    Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne, Australia
  • H. R. Taylor
    Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne, Australia
  • R. B. Vajpayee
    Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  V. Jhanji, None; M. Constantinou, None; S. Ghosh, None; H.R. Taylor, None; R.B. Vajpayee, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 5528. doi:https://doi.org/
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      V. Jhanji, M. Constantinou, S. Ghosh, H. R. Taylor, R. B. Vajpayee; Microbiological and Clinical Profile of Cases of Microbial Keratitis Residing in Aged Care Facility. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):5528. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To study the microbiological and clinical profile of cases of microbial keratitis living in aged care facility.

Methods: : A retrospective analysis of hospital records, from 1996 to 2006, of patients who had microbial keratitis, and were living in aged care facility, was undertaken. Main parameters evaluated were clinical and microbiological profile and final outcome.

Results: : Of 66 patients included in this study, 39 were females and 27 were males with mean age of 81±11 years (range: 46-97). The major risk factors for occurrence of microbial keratitis were rheumatoid arthritis (72%) and dry eyes (23%). On presentation 26% patients were receiving topical corticosteroids. A positive bacterial culture was obtained in 54 (82%) cases with Staphylococcus spp being the most prevalent isolate (50%). Seven patients had positive culture for Herpes Simplex. Surgical intervention had to be performed in 50% of cases in the form of Botox injection for induction of ptosis (27%), keratoplasty (21%), tarsorrhaphy (12%), glue (9%) or enucleation (3%). The mean pre-treatment and post-treatment visual acuity was counting fingers and 20/200 respectively.

Conclusions: : Microbial keratitis in patients living in aged care facility is usually caused by Staphylococcus spp and is related to use of topical corticosteroids and ocular surface problems. Surgical intervention is required in majority of cases and is associated with poor visual outcome.

Keywords: keratitis • aging • bacterial disease 
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